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Transcranial measurement of blood velocities in the basal cerebral arteries using pulsed Doppler ultrasound: a method of assessing the circle of willis

Transcranial measurement of blood velocities in the basal cerebral arteries using pulsed Doppler ultrasound: a method of assessing the circle of willis
Transcranial measurement of blood velocities in the basal cerebral arteries using pulsed Doppler ultrasound: a method of assessing the circle of willis

Transcranial pulsed Doppler ultrasound and spectral analysis were used for detection of blood velocities in the basal cerebral arteries. The Doppler transducer was placed superior to the zygomatic arch and during insonation of the middle cerebral artery care was taken to obtain maximum Doppler-shift frequency signals since this allowed a small angle between the ultrasound beam and this artery. Doppler signals were obtained from the middle, anterior, and posterior cerebral arteries in 20 volunteers with the average depth of the Doppler gate at 4.9 (4.6-5.2 cm), 5.2 (4.9-5.4 cm), and 6.3 cm (6.0-6.9 cm), respectively. These measurements were in agreement with those obtained for 15 cadaver studies, in whom the distance from the proposed site of the Doppler transducer to each basal cerebral artery was measured as 4.7 ± 0.6, 5.3 ± 0.5, and 5.9 ± 0.9 cm, respectively. The reproducibility of middle cerebral artery blood velocity values was tested in seven subjects and showed a variation of not more than 8% in any individual. The method was used in combination with common carotid compression to assess four patients who had occlusive extracranial carotid disease; in three the disease was more severe on one side and reversal of blood flow in the proximal ipsilateral anterior cerebral artery was demonstrated, consistent with cross flow from the contralateral side via the anterior communicating artery of the Circle of Willis. In the fourth patient augmentation of posterior cerebral artery blood velocities during common carotid compression indicated the major collateral source was from the vertebrobasilar system.

Blood velocity, Cerebral collateral, Circle of Willis, Transcranial Doppler
0301-5629
5-14
Padayachee, T.S.
31708c93-2a10-4e77-ab16-ff1178424dd3
Kirkham, F.J.
1dfbc0d5-aebe-4439-9fb2-dac6503bcd58
Lewis, R.R.
8517b745-4465-4b80-8223-504275b43673
Gillard, J.
02b08d57-78b8-4611-84e4-b5ab14134747
Hutchinson, M.C.E.
7ac9a548-354d-457d-8a7b-cdb02851db4e
Gosling, R.G.
5a770b77-41fc-43f2-90fa-f56b9eae30f0
Padayachee, T.S.
31708c93-2a10-4e77-ab16-ff1178424dd3
Kirkham, F.J.
1dfbc0d5-aebe-4439-9fb2-dac6503bcd58
Lewis, R.R.
8517b745-4465-4b80-8223-504275b43673
Gillard, J.
02b08d57-78b8-4611-84e4-b5ab14134747
Hutchinson, M.C.E.
7ac9a548-354d-457d-8a7b-cdb02851db4e
Gosling, R.G.
5a770b77-41fc-43f2-90fa-f56b9eae30f0

Padayachee, T.S., Kirkham, F.J., Lewis, R.R., Gillard, J., Hutchinson, M.C.E. and Gosling, R.G. (1986) Transcranial measurement of blood velocities in the basal cerebral arteries using pulsed Doppler ultrasound: a method of assessing the circle of willis. Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 12 (1), 5-14. (doi:10.1016/0301-5629(86)90138-9).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Transcranial pulsed Doppler ultrasound and spectral analysis were used for detection of blood velocities in the basal cerebral arteries. The Doppler transducer was placed superior to the zygomatic arch and during insonation of the middle cerebral artery care was taken to obtain maximum Doppler-shift frequency signals since this allowed a small angle between the ultrasound beam and this artery. Doppler signals were obtained from the middle, anterior, and posterior cerebral arteries in 20 volunteers with the average depth of the Doppler gate at 4.9 (4.6-5.2 cm), 5.2 (4.9-5.4 cm), and 6.3 cm (6.0-6.9 cm), respectively. These measurements were in agreement with those obtained for 15 cadaver studies, in whom the distance from the proposed site of the Doppler transducer to each basal cerebral artery was measured as 4.7 ± 0.6, 5.3 ± 0.5, and 5.9 ± 0.9 cm, respectively. The reproducibility of middle cerebral artery blood velocity values was tested in seven subjects and showed a variation of not more than 8% in any individual. The method was used in combination with common carotid compression to assess four patients who had occlusive extracranial carotid disease; in three the disease was more severe on one side and reversal of blood flow in the proximal ipsilateral anterior cerebral artery was demonstrated, consistent with cross flow from the contralateral side via the anterior communicating artery of the Circle of Willis. In the fourth patient augmentation of posterior cerebral artery blood velocities during common carotid compression indicated the major collateral source was from the vertebrobasilar system.

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More information

Published date: January 1986
Keywords: Blood velocity, Cerebral collateral, Circle of Willis, Transcranial Doppler

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429768
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429768
ISSN: 0301-5629
PURE UUID: dfe01bc7-39bd-4e6d-871a-7f3d11b7b8f7

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Date deposited: 05 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 12 Apr 2019 16:30

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Contributors

Author: T.S. Padayachee
Author: F.J. Kirkham
Author: R.R. Lewis
Author: J. Gillard
Author: R.G. Gosling

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