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Copper alloys for human infectious disease control

Copper alloys for human infectious disease control
Copper alloys for human infectious disease control
Several bacteria, known to be human pathogens, die when placed on copper alloy surfaces. The concentration of live bacteria drops from several orders of magnitude to zero on copper alloys in a few hours. In marked contrast, no reduction is seen in the concentration of live organisms on stainless steel during the six-hour test period. The copper alloys tested include high coppers, brasses, bronzes, copper -nickels and copper-nickel-zincs. The bacteria tested include E. coil O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes, both food-borne pathogens associated with several large-scale food recalls, and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRS A), a serious hospital-acquired infection. The study results suggest the selection of copper alloys for surfaces exposed to human touch or food contact. Using copper alloys in this manner can materially assist in reducing the transmission of potentially infectious organisms.
Antibacterial, Antibiotic, Antimicrobial, Bacteria, Brass, Bronze, Copper, Copper alloy, Copper-nickel, Copper-nickel zinc, E. coli O157:H7, High copper, High copper alloy, Human health, Listeria monocytogenes, MRSA, Nickel silver, Stainless steel
1546-2498
3-13
Michels, H. T.
5afc1823-e957-495b-8bf6-c719ae00d89c
Wilks, S. A.
86c1f41a-12b3-451c-9245-b1a21775e993
Noyce, J. O.
255e0de1-f6d4-4e52-a06e-47b4425a9bfa
Keevil, C. W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Michels, H. T.
5afc1823-e957-495b-8bf6-c719ae00d89c
Wilks, S. A.
86c1f41a-12b3-451c-9245-b1a21775e993
Noyce, J. O.
255e0de1-f6d4-4e52-a06e-47b4425a9bfa
Keevil, C. W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb

Michels, H. T., Wilks, S. A., Noyce, J. O. and Keevil, C. W. (2005) Copper alloys for human infectious disease control. Materials Science and Technology, 1, 3-13.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Several bacteria, known to be human pathogens, die when placed on copper alloy surfaces. The concentration of live bacteria drops from several orders of magnitude to zero on copper alloys in a few hours. In marked contrast, no reduction is seen in the concentration of live organisms on stainless steel during the six-hour test period. The copper alloys tested include high coppers, brasses, bronzes, copper -nickels and copper-nickel-zincs. The bacteria tested include E. coil O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes, both food-borne pathogens associated with several large-scale food recalls, and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRS A), a serious hospital-acquired infection. The study results suggest the selection of copper alloys for surfaces exposed to human touch or food contact. Using copper alloys in this manner can materially assist in reducing the transmission of potentially infectious organisms.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 1 December 2005
Keywords: Antibacterial, Antibiotic, Antimicrobial, Bacteria, Brass, Bronze, Copper, Copper alloy, Copper-nickel, Copper-nickel zinc, E. coli O157:H7, High copper, High copper alloy, Human health, Listeria monocytogenes, MRSA, Nickel silver, Stainless steel

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429845
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429845
ISSN: 1546-2498
PURE UUID: 48d3b26e-c0a9-4446-b717-d9746661805a
ORCID for S. A. Wilks: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4134-9415
ORCID for C. W. Keevil: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1917-7706

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 01:57

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