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Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae biofilm formation under high and low nutrient conditions

Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae biofilm formation under high and low nutrient conditions
Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae biofilm formation under high and low nutrient conditions
The rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are broadly dispersed in the environment. They have been recovered from fresh water, sea water, waste water and ewen potable water samples and are increasingly associated with nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. There is scant evidence that nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and RGM form biofilms. Therefore, an experimental system was designed to assess the ability of RGM to form biofilms under controlled laboratory conditions. A flat plate reactor flow cell was attached to either a high or low nutrient reservoir and monitored by image analysis over time. Two surfaces were chosen for assessment of biofilm growth: silastic which is commonly used in medical settings and high density polyethylene (HDPE) which is prevalent in water distribution systems. The results show that Mycobaclerium fortuitum and M. chelonae formed biofilms under both high and low nutrient conditions on both surfaces studied. These results suggest that RGM may form biofilms under a variety of conditions in industrial and medical environments.
0148-916X
513
Hall Stoodley, L.
9dd7a299-a529-401c-9ae8-63a4807c2807
Keevil, C. W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Lappin Scott, H. M.
490cae09-bbef-4536-9eb5-bd7f71184c11
Hall Stoodley, L.
9dd7a299-a529-401c-9ae8-63a4807c2807
Keevil, C. W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Lappin Scott, H. M.
490cae09-bbef-4536-9eb5-bd7f71184c11

Hall Stoodley, L., Keevil, C. W. and Lappin Scott, H. M. (1998) Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae biofilm formation under high and low nutrient conditions. International Journal of Leprosy and other Mycobacterial Diseases, 67 (4 SUPPL.), 513.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are broadly dispersed in the environment. They have been recovered from fresh water, sea water, waste water and ewen potable water samples and are increasingly associated with nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. There is scant evidence that nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and RGM form biofilms. Therefore, an experimental system was designed to assess the ability of RGM to form biofilms under controlled laboratory conditions. A flat plate reactor flow cell was attached to either a high or low nutrient reservoir and monitored by image analysis over time. Two surfaces were chosen for assessment of biofilm growth: silastic which is commonly used in medical settings and high density polyethylene (HDPE) which is prevalent in water distribution systems. The results show that Mycobaclerium fortuitum and M. chelonae formed biofilms under both high and low nutrient conditions on both surfaces studied. These results suggest that RGM may form biofilms under a variety of conditions in industrial and medical environments.

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Published date: 1 December 1998

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429846
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429846
ISSN: 0148-916X
PURE UUID: 60cdc2b3-7374-4ad1-a201-d0f23d97aa60
ORCID for C. W. Keevil: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1917-7706

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Date deposited: 08 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:58

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