The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The metabolism of oral bacteria in health and disease

The metabolism of oral bacteria in health and disease
The metabolism of oral bacteria in health and disease
© 1986 by CRC Press, Inc. 156Impetus for much of the current research on oral microorganisms has stemmed from the finding of a relationship between the metabolism of the bacteria associated with the teeth (dental plaque) and two of the most prevalent diseases affecting man: caries and periodontal disease. Dental caries results from the dissolution of enamel (demineralization) by acids produced from the bacterial degradation of dietary carbohydrates. Periodontal disease is a collective term describing several conditions that affect the supporting tissues of the teeth. Except in late stages of periodontal disease, invasion of host tissues is rare. Tissue destruction results from the production of enzymes and toxic end products of metabolism by bacteria, and is also attributable to a destructive host inflammatory response to these products and to antigenic components on the surface of these organisms.
155-182
CRC Press
Marsh, P. D.
9d226405-bfd2-432b-ac22-ea619f706805
Keevil, C. W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Hill, M.J.
Marsh, P. D.
9d226405-bfd2-432b-ac22-ea619f706805
Keevil, C. W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Hill, M.J.

Marsh, P. D. and Keevil, C. W. (1986) The metabolism of oral bacteria in health and disease. In, Hill, M.J. (ed.) Microbial Metabolism in the Digestive Tract. 1st ed. Boca Raton. CRC Press, pp. 155-182. (doi:10.1201/9781351074544).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

© 1986 by CRC Press, Inc. 156Impetus for much of the current research on oral microorganisms has stemmed from the finding of a relationship between the metabolism of the bacteria associated with the teeth (dental plaque) and two of the most prevalent diseases affecting man: caries and periodontal disease. Dental caries results from the dissolution of enamel (demineralization) by acids produced from the bacterial degradation of dietary carbohydrates. Periodontal disease is a collective term describing several conditions that affect the supporting tissues of the teeth. Except in late stages of periodontal disease, invasion of host tissues is rare. Tissue destruction results from the production of enzymes and toxic end products of metabolism by bacteria, and is also attributable to a destructive host inflammatory response to these products and to antigenic components on the surface of these organisms.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 1986

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429849
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429849
PURE UUID: 64da37d5-2d9a-4db5-8177-38999d657c8c
ORCID for C. W. Keevil: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1917-7706

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 09 Apr 2019 00:36

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×