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The continuous strength method for structural stainless steel design

The continuous strength method for structural stainless steel design
The continuous strength method for structural stainless steel design

Current stainless steel design standards are based on elastic, perfectly plastic material behaviour providing consistency with carbon steel design expressions, but often leading to overly conservative results, particularly in the case of stocky elements. More economic design rules in accordance with the actual material response of stainless steel, which shows a rounded stress-strain curve with significant strain hardening, are required. Hence, the continuous strength method (CSM) was developed. The CSM replaces the concept of cross-section classification with a cross-section deformation capacity and replaces the assumed elastic, perfectly plastic material model with one that allows for strain hardening. This paper summarises the evolution of the method and describes its recent simplified form, which is now suitable for code inclusion. Comparison of the predicted capacities with over 140 collected test results shows that the CSM offers improved accuracy and reduced scatter relative to the current design methods. The reliability of the approach has been demonstrated by statistical analyses and the CSM is currently under consideration for inclusion in European and North American design standards for stainless steel structures.

Continuous strength method, Cross-section classification, Cross-section resistance, Local buckling, Reliability analysis, Stainless steel, Strain hardening
0263-8231
42-49
Afshan, S.
68dcdcac-c2aa-4c09-951c-da4992e72086
Gardner, L.
2d5fc7ca-efd9-425a-981c-73d3937aca08
Afshan, S.
68dcdcac-c2aa-4c09-951c-da4992e72086
Gardner, L.
2d5fc7ca-efd9-425a-981c-73d3937aca08

Afshan, S. and Gardner, L. (2013) The continuous strength method for structural stainless steel design. Thin-Walled Structures, 68, 42-49. (doi:10.1016/j.tws.2013.02.011).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Current stainless steel design standards are based on elastic, perfectly plastic material behaviour providing consistency with carbon steel design expressions, but often leading to overly conservative results, particularly in the case of stocky elements. More economic design rules in accordance with the actual material response of stainless steel, which shows a rounded stress-strain curve with significant strain hardening, are required. Hence, the continuous strength method (CSM) was developed. The CSM replaces the concept of cross-section classification with a cross-section deformation capacity and replaces the assumed elastic, perfectly plastic material model with one that allows for strain hardening. This paper summarises the evolution of the method and describes its recent simplified form, which is now suitable for code inclusion. Comparison of the predicted capacities with over 140 collected test results shows that the CSM offers improved accuracy and reduced scatter relative to the current design methods. The reliability of the approach has been demonstrated by statistical analyses and the CSM is currently under consideration for inclusion in European and North American design standards for stainless steel structures.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 February 2013
e-pub ahead of print date: 9 April 2013
Published date: July 2013
Keywords: Continuous strength method, Cross-section classification, Cross-section resistance, Local buckling, Reliability analysis, Stainless steel, Strain hardening

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429860
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429860
ISSN: 0263-8231
PURE UUID: 9b1c442d-2889-4c37-9492-fbae8e1afad3

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 08 Apr 2019 16:30

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