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On the use of virtual sensing for the real-time detection and active control of a scattered acoustic field

On the use of virtual sensing for the real-time detection and active control of a scattered acoustic field
On the use of virtual sensing for the real-time detection and active control of a scattered acoustic field
There is an interest in many situations to achieve a perfect acoustic cloak, which renders an object acoustically invisible. Although significant contributions have been made to realising passive acoustic cloaks, there is significant potential in the use of active control technologies for cloaking. However, this requires that an accurate estimate of the scattered pressure can be obtained in real-time to provide an error signal to the controller. This is non-trivial, since a standard pressure sensor would detect the contributions from both the incident and scattered fields. The measured pressure must, therefore, be decomposed into these two constituent parts, which has previously been achieved using a double layer of pressure sensors enclosing the scattering object. This paper proposes an alternative method of estimating the scattered component of the sound field, which does not use a double layer of sensors. The proposed virtual sensing method is based on an adaptation of the Remote Microphone Technique that has previously been used in active noise control applications. The proposed method filters the measured pressures using an optimally designed filter to estimate the scattered component of the sound field. The paper first formulates the proposed virtual sensing method for scattering detection and then presents an investigation into the accuracy of this estimation procedure using a series of measurements taken in an anechoic chamber. The effect of varying both the number of sources in the incident sound field, and the number of microphones used in the estimation is investigated. Finally, the practicability of designing an active control system using the estimated scattered field is discussed, and results from offline simulations of active control are presented.
Active Control, Acoustic Scattering, Active Cloaking, Virtual Sensing, Signal Processing
House, Charlie
15d5f04a-da71-4435-9b8c-6bf50d8e7908
Cheer, Jordan
8e452f50-4c7d-4d4e-913a-34015e99b9dc
Daley, Stephen
53cef7f1-77fa-4a4c-9745-b6a0ba4f42e6
House, Charlie
15d5f04a-da71-4435-9b8c-6bf50d8e7908
Cheer, Jordan
8e452f50-4c7d-4d4e-913a-34015e99b9dc
Daley, Stephen
53cef7f1-77fa-4a4c-9745-b6a0ba4f42e6

House, Charlie, Cheer, Jordan and Daley, Stephen (2019) On the use of virtual sensing for the real-time detection and active control of a scattered acoustic field. 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, Montreal, Canada. 07 - 11 Jul 2019.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

There is an interest in many situations to achieve a perfect acoustic cloak, which renders an object acoustically invisible. Although significant contributions have been made to realising passive acoustic cloaks, there is significant potential in the use of active control technologies for cloaking. However, this requires that an accurate estimate of the scattered pressure can be obtained in real-time to provide an error signal to the controller. This is non-trivial, since a standard pressure sensor would detect the contributions from both the incident and scattered fields. The measured pressure must, therefore, be decomposed into these two constituent parts, which has previously been achieved using a double layer of pressure sensors enclosing the scattering object. This paper proposes an alternative method of estimating the scattered component of the sound field, which does not use a double layer of sensors. The proposed virtual sensing method is based on an adaptation of the Remote Microphone Technique that has previously been used in active noise control applications. The proposed method filters the measured pressures using an optimally designed filter to estimate the scattered component of the sound field. The paper first formulates the proposed virtual sensing method for scattering detection and then presents an investigation into the accuracy of this estimation procedure using a series of measurements taken in an anechoic chamber. The effect of varying both the number of sources in the incident sound field, and the number of microphones used in the estimation is investigated. Finally, the practicability of designing an active control system using the estimated scattered field is discussed, and results from offline simulations of active control are presented.

Text
FINAL - ON THE USE OF VIRTUAL SENSING FOR THE REAL-TIME DETECTION AND ACTIVE CONTROL OF A SCATTERED ACOUSTIC FIELD - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 28 April 2019
Published date: July 2019
Venue - Dates: 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, Montreal, Canada, 2019-07-07 - 2019-07-11
Keywords: Active Control, Acoustic Scattering, Active Cloaking, Virtual Sensing, Signal Processing

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429989
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429989
PURE UUID: b7d4d599-35bd-4f87-8b8e-62580ef835b1
ORCID for Charlie House: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9653-3594
ORCID for Jordan Cheer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0552-5506

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 02 Jul 2019 00:32

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