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International migration as a driver of political and social change: Evidence from Morocco

International migration as a driver of political and social change: Evidence from Morocco
International migration as a driver of political and social change: Evidence from Morocco
This paper focuses on the impact of international migration on the transfer
of political and social norms. Exploiting recent and unique data on Morocco, it explores whether households with return and current migrants bear different political preferences and behaviours than non-migrant families. Once controlling for the double selection into emigration and return migration, the findings suggest that having a returnee in the household increases the demand for
political and social change. This result is driven by returnees mostly from Western European countries, who were exposed to more democratic norms in the destination. However, we find a negative impact of having a current migrant on the willingness of the left-behind households to change. This result is driven by migrants to non-Western countries, where the quality of political and social institutions is lower. Our results are robust to also controlling for destination selectivity.
international migration, social remittances
0933-1433
1171-1203
Tuccio, Michele
94196a1d-80d6-44aa-a5e1-4e72d2fdf581
Wahba, Jackline
03ae9304-c329-40c6-9bfc-d91cfa9e7164
Hamdouch, Bachir
ae30b737-ca56-4ce0-a94b-3096520718da
Tuccio, Michele
94196a1d-80d6-44aa-a5e1-4e72d2fdf581
Wahba, Jackline
03ae9304-c329-40c6-9bfc-d91cfa9e7164
Hamdouch, Bachir
ae30b737-ca56-4ce0-a94b-3096520718da

Tuccio, Michele, Wahba, Jackline and Hamdouch, Bachir (2019) International migration as a driver of political and social change: Evidence from Morocco. Journal of Population Economics, 32 (4), 1171-1203. (doi:10.1007/s00148-019-00734-9).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper focuses on the impact of international migration on the transfer
of political and social norms. Exploiting recent and unique data on Morocco, it explores whether households with return and current migrants bear different political preferences and behaviours than non-migrant families. Once controlling for the double selection into emigration and return migration, the findings suggest that having a returnee in the household increases the demand for
political and social change. This result is driven by returnees mostly from Western European countries, who were exposed to more democratic norms in the destination. However, we find a negative impact of having a current migrant on the willingness of the left-behind households to change. This result is driven by migrants to non-Western countries, where the quality of political and social institutions is lower. Our results are robust to also controlling for destination selectivity.

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Accepted/In Press date: 2 April 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 May 2019
Published date: October 2019
Keywords: international migration, social remittances

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430019
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430019
ISSN: 0933-1433
PURE UUID: 9a4b4ddb-622c-449a-8f50-a4d666521266
ORCID for Jackline Wahba: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0002-3443

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:54

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