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Shape from shading under inconsistent illumination

Shape from shading under inconsistent illumination
Shape from shading under inconsistent illumination
People are able to perceive the 3D shape of illuminated surfaces using image shading cues. Theories about how we accomplish this often assume that the human visual system estimates a single lighting direction and interprets shading cues in accord with that estimate. In natural scenes, however, lighting can be much more complex than this, with multiple nearby light sources. Here we show that the human visual system can successfully judge 3D surface shape even when the lighting direction varies from place to place over a surface, provided the scale at which these lighting changes occur is similar to, or larger than, the size of the shape features being judged. Furthermore, we show that despite being able to accommodate rapid changes in lighting direction when judging shape, observers are generally unable to detect these changes. We conclude that, rather than relying on a single estimated illumination direction, the human visual system can accommodate illumination that varies substantially and rapidly across a surface.
1534-7362
1-15
Wilder, John
131e4e59-c62b-4d0c-879c-d5991ceaa98a
Adams, Wendy
25685aaa-fc54-4d25-8d65-f35f4c5ab688
Murray, Richard
3e90d928-7264-489b-9299-0eb7609046d6
Wilder, John
131e4e59-c62b-4d0c-879c-d5991ceaa98a
Adams, Wendy
25685aaa-fc54-4d25-8d65-f35f4c5ab688
Murray, Richard
3e90d928-7264-489b-9299-0eb7609046d6

Wilder, John, Adams, Wendy and Murray, Richard (2019) Shape from shading under inconsistent illumination. Journal of Vision, 19 (6), 1-15, [2]. (doi:10.1167/19.6.2).

Record type: Article

Abstract

People are able to perceive the 3D shape of illuminated surfaces using image shading cues. Theories about how we accomplish this often assume that the human visual system estimates a single lighting direction and interprets shading cues in accord with that estimate. In natural scenes, however, lighting can be much more complex than this, with multiple nearby light sources. Here we show that the human visual system can successfully judge 3D surface shape even when the lighting direction varies from place to place over a surface, provided the scale at which these lighting changes occur is similar to, or larger than, the size of the shape features being judged. Furthermore, we show that despite being able to accommodate rapid changes in lighting direction when judging shape, observers are generally unable to detect these changes. We conclude that, rather than relying on a single estimated illumination direction, the human visual system can accommodate illumination that varies substantially and rapidly across a surface.

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Accepted/In Press date: 4 April 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 June 2019
Published date: 5 June 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430028
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430028
ISSN: 1534-7362
PURE UUID: edd0b707-5527-4e6d-a6d3-7f179857df47
ORCID for Wendy Adams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5832-1056

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:48

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Contributors

Author: John Wilder
Author: Wendy Adams ORCID iD
Author: Richard Murray

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