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What separates narcissism from self-esteem? A social-cognitive perspective

What separates narcissism from self-esteem? A social-cognitive perspective
What separates narcissism from self-esteem? A social-cognitive perspective

Psychologists claim that narcissists have inflated, exaggerated, or excessive self-esteem. Media reports state that narcissists suffer from self-esteem on steroids. The conclusion seems obvious: Narcissists have too much self-esteem. A growing body of research shows, however, that narcissism and self-esteem are only weakly related. What, then, separates narcissism from self-esteem? We argue that narcissism and self-esteem are rooted in distinct core beliefs-beliefs about the nature of the self, of others, and of the relationship between the self and others. These beliefs arise early in development, are cultivated by distinct socialization practices, and create unique behavioral patterns. Emerging experimental research shows that these beliefs can be changed through precise intervention, leading to changes at the level of narcissism and self-esteem. An important task for future research will be to develop interventions that simultaneously lower narcissism and raise self-esteem from an early age.

Childhood, Core beliefs, Intervention, Narcissism, Self-esteem, Socialization, Stability
47-55
Springer International Publishing
Brummelman, Eddie
b35dff27-28b1-4184-ab81-da7815676194
Gürel, Çisem
799b1a3d-7d3a-481e-94f4-362677850e22
Thomaes, Sander
ec762bc3-0df4-42c3-99f4-1a7b65f55053
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Hermann, A.
Brunell, A.
Foster, J.
Brummelman, Eddie
b35dff27-28b1-4184-ab81-da7815676194
Gürel, Çisem
799b1a3d-7d3a-481e-94f4-362677850e22
Thomaes, Sander
ec762bc3-0df4-42c3-99f4-1a7b65f55053
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Hermann, A.
Brunell, A.
Foster, J.

Brummelman, Eddie, Gürel, Çisem, Thomaes, Sander and Sedikides, Constantine (2018) What separates narcissism from self-esteem? A social-cognitive perspective. In, Hermann, A., Brunell, A. and Foster, J. (eds.) Handbook of Trait Narcissism: Key Advances, Research Methods, and Controversies. Cham. Springer International Publishing, pp. 47-55. (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-92171-6_5).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Psychologists claim that narcissists have inflated, exaggerated, or excessive self-esteem. Media reports state that narcissists suffer from self-esteem on steroids. The conclusion seems obvious: Narcissists have too much self-esteem. A growing body of research shows, however, that narcissism and self-esteem are only weakly related. What, then, separates narcissism from self-esteem? We argue that narcissism and self-esteem are rooted in distinct core beliefs-beliefs about the nature of the self, of others, and of the relationship between the self and others. These beliefs arise early in development, are cultivated by distinct socialization practices, and create unique behavioral patterns. Emerging experimental research shows that these beliefs can be changed through precise intervention, leading to changes at the level of narcissism and self-esteem. An important task for future research will be to develop interventions that simultaneously lower narcissism and raise self-esteem from an early age.

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Published date: 27 September 2018
Keywords: Childhood, Core beliefs, Intervention, Narcissism, Self-esteem, Socialization, Stability

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Local EPrints ID: 430056
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430056
PURE UUID: d986c9b5-cfab-4bd8-8596-88500f5381f5

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Date deposited: 11 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 11 Apr 2019 16:30

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Contributors

Author: Eddie Brummelman
Author: Çisem Gürel
Author: Sander Thomaes
Editor: A. Hermann
Editor: A. Brunell
Editor: J. Foster

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