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Falls self-management interventions for people with Parkinson’s: a systematic review

Falls self-management interventions for people with Parkinson’s: a systematic review
Falls self-management interventions for people with Parkinson’s: a systematic review
Falls are common in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Increased involvement of people with Parkinson’s (PwP) in their care has been associated with enhanced satisfaction. Self-management programmes in other long-term conditions (LTCs) have led to improvements in physical and psychological outcomes. These have been more effective when targeted toward a specific behavior.

Objective: this paper aimed to identify and review falls self-management interventions for PwP.

Methods: a systematic review was conducted. Electronic databases were searched in June 2018. Primary research studies (any design) reporting the delivery of falls self-management interventions to PwP were included. Data was extracted from each article and synthesised narratively.

Results: six articles were identified, relating to five different self-management interventions. All described a self-management intervention delivered alongside physiotherapy. Intervention delivery was through either group discussion (n=3) or falls booklets (n=3). Interventions were often incompletely described; the most common components were information about the condition, training/ rehearsal for psychological strategies and lifestyle advice and support. Arising from the design of articles included the effects of self-management and physiotherapy could not be separated. Three articles measured falls, only one led to a reduction. Four articles measured quality of life, only one led to improvement. No articles assessed skill acquisition or adherence to the self-management intervention.

Conclusions: few falls self-management interventions for PwP have been evaluated and reported. The components of an effective intervention remain unclear. Given the benefits of self-management interventions in other LTCs, it is important that falls self-management interventions are developed and evaluated to support PwP.
Owen, Charlotte, Louise
970660f9-538f-44b5-8595-e262cc717086
Ibrahim, Kinda
54f027ad-0599-4dd4-bdbf-b9307841a294
Dennison, Laura
15c399cb-9a81-4948-8906-21944c033c20
Roberts, Helen
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253
Owen, Charlotte, Louise
970660f9-538f-44b5-8595-e262cc717086
Ibrahim, Kinda
54f027ad-0599-4dd4-bdbf-b9307841a294
Dennison, Laura
15c399cb-9a81-4948-8906-21944c033c20
Roberts, Helen
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253

Owen, Charlotte, Louise, Ibrahim, Kinda, Dennison, Laura and Roberts, Helen (2019) Falls self-management interventions for people with Parkinson’s: a systematic review. Journal of Parkinson's Disease. (doi:10.3233/JPD-181524).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Falls are common in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Increased involvement of people with Parkinson’s (PwP) in their care has been associated with enhanced satisfaction. Self-management programmes in other long-term conditions (LTCs) have led to improvements in physical and psychological outcomes. These have been more effective when targeted toward a specific behavior.

Objective: this paper aimed to identify and review falls self-management interventions for PwP.

Methods: a systematic review was conducted. Electronic databases were searched in June 2018. Primary research studies (any design) reporting the delivery of falls self-management interventions to PwP were included. Data was extracted from each article and synthesised narratively.

Results: six articles were identified, relating to five different self-management interventions. All described a self-management intervention delivered alongside physiotherapy. Intervention delivery was through either group discussion (n=3) or falls booklets (n=3). Interventions were often incompletely described; the most common components were information about the condition, training/ rehearsal for psychological strategies and lifestyle advice and support. Arising from the design of articles included the effects of self-management and physiotherapy could not be separated. Three articles measured falls, only one led to a reduction. Four articles measured quality of life, only one led to improvement. No articles assessed skill acquisition or adherence to the self-management intervention.

Conclusions: few falls self-management interventions for PwP have been evaluated and reported. The components of an effective intervention remain unclear. Given the benefits of self-management interventions in other LTCs, it is important that falls self-management interventions are developed and evaluated to support PwP.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 14 February 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 April 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430164
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430164
PURE UUID: 6deea9bd-771b-4297-9ae1-7f10ee3bffe0
ORCID for Kinda Ibrahim: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5709-3867
ORCID for Laura Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0122-6610
ORCID for Helen Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5291-1880

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Date deposited: 15 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 08:34

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