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Social participation and health outcomes among carers in Great Britain

Social participation and health outcomes among carers in Great Britain
Social participation and health outcomes among carers in Great Britain
As the population ages, individuals in mid-life are increasingly likely to provide informal care to their parents. The Carers Trust notes that currently in the UK, one in ten people (around 7 million) are providing informal care. This is predicted to rise to over 10 million by 2030.
A recent survey by Carers UK found 72% of carers reported mental health problems and 61% said they had physical health problems as a result of caring. However, social participation can potentially alleviate the adverse effects of care provision.
Against this background, we investigate the health and social participation of carers to inform public policy design. This study adopted a mixed-methods approach and used data from the National Child Development Study to explore the associations between the carers’ social participation patterns and their health outcomes, distinguishing between more and less intense care providers.
ESRC Centre for Population Change
Vlachantoni, Athina
06a52fbb-f2a0-4c81-9fbc-d6efc736c6cb
Wang, Ning
410c94b4-b99a-42bf-8701-1fbca4d634a6
Feng, Zhixin
33c0073f-a67c-4d8a-9fea-5a502420e589
Evandrou, Maria
cd2210ea-9625-44d7-b0f4-fc0721a25d28
Mcgowan, Teresa
4524e894-04de-4822-8508-f4b966e12ae2
Dey, Becki
3d22f8a6-7085-493c-864f-4cc1bcdebfc5
Vlachantoni, Athina
06a52fbb-f2a0-4c81-9fbc-d6efc736c6cb
Wang, Ning
410c94b4-b99a-42bf-8701-1fbca4d634a6
Feng, Zhixin
33c0073f-a67c-4d8a-9fea-5a502420e589
Evandrou, Maria
cd2210ea-9625-44d7-b0f4-fc0721a25d28
Mcgowan, Teresa
4524e894-04de-4822-8508-f4b966e12ae2
Dey, Becki
3d22f8a6-7085-493c-864f-4cc1bcdebfc5

Vlachantoni, Athina, Wang, Ning, Feng, Zhixin and Evandrou, Maria , Mcgowan, Teresa and Dey, Becki (eds.) (2019) Social participation and health outcomes among carers in Great Britain (CPC Briefing Papers, 47) Southampton. ESRC Centre for Population Change 4pp.

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

As the population ages, individuals in mid-life are increasingly likely to provide informal care to their parents. The Carers Trust notes that currently in the UK, one in ten people (around 7 million) are providing informal care. This is predicted to rise to over 10 million by 2030.
A recent survey by Carers UK found 72% of carers reported mental health problems and 61% said they had physical health problems as a result of caring. However, social participation can potentially alleviate the adverse effects of care provision.
Against this background, we investigate the health and social participation of carers to inform public policy design. This study adopted a mixed-methods approach and used data from the National Child Development Study to explore the associations between the carers’ social participation patterns and their health outcomes, distinguishing between more and less intense care providers.

Full text not available from this repository.

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Published date: 8 April 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430191
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430191
PURE UUID: e38fa8af-1edf-4b57-8190-a66b957ac667

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Date deposited: 16 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 16 Apr 2019 16:30

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