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A latent class analysis of sexual and romantic relationships among HIV-positive and HIV-negative gay and bisexual men in Vancouver

A latent class analysis of sexual and romantic relationships among HIV-positive and HIV-negative gay and bisexual men in Vancouver
A latent class analysis of sexual and romantic relationships among HIV-positive and HIV-negative gay and bisexual men in Vancouver
Quantitative studies of gay and bisexual men have often reduced relational experiences to single dimensions and explored linkages with sexual risk behaviours. We sought to document the intersection of multiple relationship dimensions among 218 HIV-positive and 556 HIV-negative gay and bisexual men, and estimate associations with love and affection as well as various health and social covariates. We performed latent class analysis of relationships, employing five indicators: relationship status, sexual agreement (monogamous/open), and number of recent sex partners, sex parties, and anonymous sex encounters. We assessed differences in love and affection, and identified covariates using multinomial logistic regression. Two latent classes involved single men: ‘single, less sex partners’ (45% of sample) and ‘single, more sex partners’ (17%), differentiated by number of partners (52% vs. 92% of each class had ≥5 partners, respectively), party sex (3% vs. 57%), and anonymous sex (2% vs. 58%). Three involved regular partners: ‘monogamish’ (15%) (78% were monogamous yet 50% reported ≥1 recent sex partner); ‘open, less sex partners’ (15%) (100% open, 43% ≥5 partners, 10% party sex, 4% anonymous sex); and ‘open, more sex partners’ (9%) (96% open, 92% ≥5 partners, 47% party sex, 69% anonymous sex). Love and affection were common across classes, although more prevalent among partnered (85–91%) versus single (48–51%) men. Relative to ‘single/less partners,’ the study demonstrated that higher sexual sensation seeking scores were associated with membership in every class except ‘monogamish’; erectile dysfunction drug use was associated with being in the ‘more partners’ (single and open) classes; anxiety and older age were associated with the ‘open/less partners’ class; and loneliness was associated with reduced odds of membership in all three partnered classes. We uncovered considerable relational diversity among gay and bisexual men and complex associations with love and wellbeing. Findings are relevant for sex researchers, educators, and therapists.
1188-4517
78-96
Carter, Allison
173bd86a-9315-49f6-82d1-9c802142aba9
Lachowsky, Nathan
87634bac-759c-4e7b-9f16-22fb37e87cf6
Forrest, Jamie I.
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Cui, Zishan
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Sereda, Paul
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Kaida, Angela
dffd53ea-0f05-4231-ae41-bef82ae3155d
Armstrong, Heather L.
3dc9c223-1a61-47ad-ab0b-50d06cddf4f2
Card, Kiffer G.
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Montaner, Julio S.g.
8732d65e-cae2-408e-bf60-580f8298547a
Moore, David
3b5e246f-616d-4a9d-9f14-3e33911a8358
Roth, Eric A.
4900d79c-ac00-475b-8bb9-e96243905ca7
Hogg, Robert S.
3f71ad69-9c8a-4732-bb86-4aa0652e1f3f
Carter, Allison
173bd86a-9315-49f6-82d1-9c802142aba9
Lachowsky, Nathan
87634bac-759c-4e7b-9f16-22fb37e87cf6
Forrest, Jamie I.
2ab89627-bb01-4e68-90d6-9ddfc8291c7e
Cui, Zishan
298721d1-0246-4602-9120-c626eec8b142
Sereda, Paul
7b1e0f3a-2477-4bc7-9f65-910dee84a320
Kaida, Angela
dffd53ea-0f05-4231-ae41-bef82ae3155d
Armstrong, Heather L.
3dc9c223-1a61-47ad-ab0b-50d06cddf4f2
Card, Kiffer G.
4bece098-5a9b-46cf-a64e-615f14acce73
Montaner, Julio S.g.
8732d65e-cae2-408e-bf60-580f8298547a
Moore, David
3b5e246f-616d-4a9d-9f14-3e33911a8358
Roth, Eric A.
4900d79c-ac00-475b-8bb9-e96243905ca7
Hogg, Robert S.
3f71ad69-9c8a-4732-bb86-4aa0652e1f3f

Carter, Allison, Lachowsky, Nathan, Forrest, Jamie I., Cui, Zishan, Sereda, Paul, Kaida, Angela, Armstrong, Heather L., Card, Kiffer G., Montaner, Julio S.g., Moore, David, Roth, Eric A. and Hogg, Robert S. (2017) A latent class analysis of sexual and romantic relationships among HIV-positive and HIV-negative gay and bisexual men in Vancouver. The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, 26 (2), 78-96. (doi:10.3138/cjhs.262.A1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Quantitative studies of gay and bisexual men have often reduced relational experiences to single dimensions and explored linkages with sexual risk behaviours. We sought to document the intersection of multiple relationship dimensions among 218 HIV-positive and 556 HIV-negative gay and bisexual men, and estimate associations with love and affection as well as various health and social covariates. We performed latent class analysis of relationships, employing five indicators: relationship status, sexual agreement (monogamous/open), and number of recent sex partners, sex parties, and anonymous sex encounters. We assessed differences in love and affection, and identified covariates using multinomial logistic regression. Two latent classes involved single men: ‘single, less sex partners’ (45% of sample) and ‘single, more sex partners’ (17%), differentiated by number of partners (52% vs. 92% of each class had ≥5 partners, respectively), party sex (3% vs. 57%), and anonymous sex (2% vs. 58%). Three involved regular partners: ‘monogamish’ (15%) (78% were monogamous yet 50% reported ≥1 recent sex partner); ‘open, less sex partners’ (15%) (100% open, 43% ≥5 partners, 10% party sex, 4% anonymous sex); and ‘open, more sex partners’ (9%) (96% open, 92% ≥5 partners, 47% party sex, 69% anonymous sex). Love and affection were common across classes, although more prevalent among partnered (85–91%) versus single (48–51%) men. Relative to ‘single/less partners,’ the study demonstrated that higher sexual sensation seeking scores were associated with membership in every class except ‘monogamish’; erectile dysfunction drug use was associated with being in the ‘more partners’ (single and open) classes; anxiety and older age were associated with the ‘open/less partners’ class; and loneliness was associated with reduced odds of membership in all three partnered classes. We uncovered considerable relational diversity among gay and bisexual men and complex associations with love and wellbeing. Findings are relevant for sex researchers, educators, and therapists.

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Published date: 1 August 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430213
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430213
ISSN: 1188-4517
PURE UUID: 2e78d224-4f9a-4bad-be03-8bea50f5756e
ORCID for Heather L. Armstrong: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1071-8644

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Date deposited: 16 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:22

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Contributors

Author: Allison Carter
Author: Nathan Lachowsky
Author: Jamie I. Forrest
Author: Zishan Cui
Author: Paul Sereda
Author: Angela Kaida
Author: Kiffer G. Card
Author: Julio S.g. Montaner
Author: David Moore
Author: Eric A. Roth
Author: Robert S. Hogg

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