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The experiences of people who receive swallow therapy following surgical treatment of head and neck cancer

The experiences of people who receive swallow therapy following surgical treatment of head and neck cancer
The experiences of people who receive swallow therapy following surgical treatment of head and neck cancer
Purpose: this research was initiated to explore the experiences and important elements of swallow therapy in people following surgery for treatment of head and neck cancer.

Methods: one to one, face to face interviews were conducted with people with head and neck cancer post oral reconstructive surgery (free, pedicled or bony flap), 7-14 days post-surgery. Analysis was conducted using interpretive phenomenology.

Results: analysis of interviews from 15 patients identified two overarching themes: ‘I never dreamt’ and ‘They look at you and they speak to you’. There was no way to adequately prepare for the enormity of surgery and its consequences, however the way health professionals interacted and communicated with the person, rather than their altered and disfigured selves was healing and therapeutic.

Conclusions: novel ways to prepare people for head and neck cancer surgery, and support in recovery are required, including ways to connect and help people feel human again.
2212-4403
Dawson, Camilla
f24fcf2a-a7f8-4e04-bd85-bc6852de9e43
Adams, Jo
6e38b8bb-9467-4585-86e4-14062b02bcba
Fenlon, Deborah
52f9a9f1-1643-449c-9856-258ef563342c
Dawson, Camilla
f24fcf2a-a7f8-4e04-bd85-bc6852de9e43
Adams, Jo
6e38b8bb-9467-4585-86e4-14062b02bcba
Fenlon, Deborah
52f9a9f1-1643-449c-9856-258ef563342c

Dawson, Camilla, Adams, Jo and Fenlon, Deborah (2019) The experiences of people who receive swallow therapy following surgical treatment of head and neck cancer. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology. (doi:10.1016/j.oooo.2019.03.012).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: this research was initiated to explore the experiences and important elements of swallow therapy in people following surgery for treatment of head and neck cancer.

Methods: one to one, face to face interviews were conducted with people with head and neck cancer post oral reconstructive surgery (free, pedicled or bony flap), 7-14 days post-surgery. Analysis was conducted using interpretive phenomenology.

Results: analysis of interviews from 15 patients identified two overarching themes: ‘I never dreamt’ and ‘They look at you and they speak to you’. There was no way to adequately prepare for the enormity of surgery and its consequences, however the way health professionals interacted and communicated with the person, rather than their altered and disfigured selves was healing and therapeutic.

Conclusions: novel ways to prepare people for head and neck cancer surgery, and support in recovery are required, including ways to connect and help people feel human again.

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The experiences of people who receive swallow therapy - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 March 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 March 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430509
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430509
ISSN: 2212-4403
PURE UUID: 64c877cc-4d50-4b8e-8657-70233b205c69
ORCID for Jo Adams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1765-7060

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 05:14

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Contributors

Author: Camilla Dawson
Author: Jo Adams ORCID iD
Author: Deborah Fenlon

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