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The effects of 4 weeks normobaric hypoxia training on microvascular responses in the forearm flexor

The effects of 4 weeks normobaric hypoxia training on microvascular responses in the forearm flexor
The effects of 4 weeks normobaric hypoxia training on microvascular responses in the forearm flexor

Intermittent exposure to hypoxia can lead to improved endurance performance. Currently, it is unclear whether peripheral adaptions play a role in improving oxygen delivery and utilization following both training and detraining. This study aimed to characterize skeletal muscle blood flow (mBF), oxygen consumption (mV̇O 2 ), and perfusion adaptations to i) 4-weeks handgrip training in hypoxic and normoxic conditions, and ii) following 4-weeks detraining. Using a randomised crossover design, 9 males completed 30-min handgrip training four times a week in hypoxic (14% FiO 2 ~ 3250m altitude) and normoxic conditions. mBF, mV̇O 2 and perfusion were assessed pre, post 4-weeks training, and following 4-weeks detraining. Hierarchical linear modelling found that mV̇O 2 increased at a significantly faster rate (58%) with hypoxic training (0.09 mlO 2 ·min −1 · 100g −1 per week); perfusion increased at a significantly (69%) faster rate with hypoxic training (3.72 μM per week). mBF did not significantly change for the normoxic condition, but there was a significant increase of 0.38 ml· min −1  · 100ml −1 per week (95% CI: 0.35, 0.40) for the hypoxic condition. During 4-weeks detraining, mV̇O 2 and perfusion significantly declined at similar rates for both conditions, whereas mBF decreased significantly faster following hypoxic training. Four weeks hypoxic training increases the delivery and utilisation of oxygen in the periphery.

Haemodynamic, handgrip exercise, microvascular adaptation, near infrared spectroscopy
0264-0414
1235-1241
Fryer, S.
b3bb565e-d38b-401b-baf4-18fac8ee765b
Stone, K.
8c4248cc-5703-4af7-ad9b-d9bdff0fec17
Dickson, T.
8c5ea62c-306a-4904-a7e7-1a663ad1b2e2
Wilhelmsen, A.
5cbb27b3-1be5-4015-9a5f-d1c6838b321c
Cowen, D.
b24a2255-baa6-4c80-91b8-57633a5c04d7
Faulkner, J.
3a413d68-0744-4f1b-b90a-acbcc5fda1e5
Lambrick, D.
1deafa4b-acf3-4eff-83c9-f8274e47e993
Stoner, L.
3ddab4db-e142-4bf1-bb1c-b6d685933aa2
Fryer, S.
b3bb565e-d38b-401b-baf4-18fac8ee765b
Stone, K.
8c4248cc-5703-4af7-ad9b-d9bdff0fec17
Dickson, T.
8c5ea62c-306a-4904-a7e7-1a663ad1b2e2
Wilhelmsen, A.
5cbb27b3-1be5-4015-9a5f-d1c6838b321c
Cowen, D.
b24a2255-baa6-4c80-91b8-57633a5c04d7
Faulkner, J.
3a413d68-0744-4f1b-b90a-acbcc5fda1e5
Lambrick, D.
1deafa4b-acf3-4eff-83c9-f8274e47e993
Stoner, L.
3ddab4db-e142-4bf1-bb1c-b6d685933aa2

Fryer, S., Stone, K., Dickson, T., Wilhelmsen, A., Cowen, D., Faulkner, J., Lambrick, D. and Stoner, L. (2019) The effects of 4 weeks normobaric hypoxia training on microvascular responses in the forearm flexor. Journal of Sports Sciences, 37 (11), 1235-1241. (doi:10.1080/02640414.2018.1554177).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Intermittent exposure to hypoxia can lead to improved endurance performance. Currently, it is unclear whether peripheral adaptions play a role in improving oxygen delivery and utilization following both training and detraining. This study aimed to characterize skeletal muscle blood flow (mBF), oxygen consumption (mV̇O 2 ), and perfusion adaptations to i) 4-weeks handgrip training in hypoxic and normoxic conditions, and ii) following 4-weeks detraining. Using a randomised crossover design, 9 males completed 30-min handgrip training four times a week in hypoxic (14% FiO 2 ~ 3250m altitude) and normoxic conditions. mBF, mV̇O 2 and perfusion were assessed pre, post 4-weeks training, and following 4-weeks detraining. Hierarchical linear modelling found that mV̇O 2 increased at a significantly faster rate (58%) with hypoxic training (0.09 mlO 2 ·min −1 · 100g −1 per week); perfusion increased at a significantly (69%) faster rate with hypoxic training (3.72 μM per week). mBF did not significantly change for the normoxic condition, but there was a significant increase of 0.38 ml· min −1  · 100ml −1 per week (95% CI: 0.35, 0.40) for the hypoxic condition. During 4-weeks detraining, mV̇O 2 and perfusion significantly declined at similar rates for both conditions, whereas mBF decreased significantly faster following hypoxic training. Four weeks hypoxic training increases the delivery and utilisation of oxygen in the periphery.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 November 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 17 December 2018
Published date: 2019
Keywords: Haemodynamic, handgrip exercise, microvascular adaptation, near infrared spectroscopy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430529
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430529
ISSN: 0264-0414
PURE UUID: 20a7412d-433d-4bb2-8a0b-034e91f0d001
ORCID for D. Lambrick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0325-6015

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Date deposited: 03 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:07

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Contributors

Author: S. Fryer
Author: K. Stone
Author: T. Dickson
Author: A. Wilhelmsen
Author: D. Cowen
Author: J. Faulkner
Author: D. Lambrick ORCID iD
Author: L. Stoner

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