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Sustainable livelihoods: the role of small-scale aquaculture to food security in Malawi

Sustainable livelihoods: the role of small-scale aquaculture to food security in Malawi
Sustainable livelihoods: the role of small-scale aquaculture to food security in Malawi
The rapid rise and evolution of aquaculture over the past few decades has led to both optimism and apprehension regarding the sector’s sustainability and role to food security. Comprised predominantly of small-scale operators, the sector is recognised to play a critical role in supporting livelihoods, contributing to food security and alleviating poverty. However, the ability to achieve these potential benefits is not a given and the transformation of communities adopting aquaculture can be positive, neutral or negative. Assessing the sectors contribution in a systematic way has been an uphill challenge due to the typical part-time and dynamic temporal engagement of operators as well as the complex socio-ecological factors that mediate aquaculture development outcomes. Moreover, the multidimensional concept of food security presents challenges to the assessment of the role of aquaculture to food security. The aim of this thesis is to explore and assess the role of small-scale aquaculture to food security. This thesis adopts a mixed methods approach and is guided by the Sustainable Livelihoods Approach framework. This thesis’s contribution to the debate focuses on Malawi, a country where the potential for aquaculture development is reported considerable. Drawing on mixed qualitative and quantitative methods, overall findings reveal that small-scale aquaculture contributes marginally but positively to local livelihoods through complex pathways to improved food security, improved well-being and reduced vulnerability. However, the type of aquaculture development, gender relations and cultural norms shape development outcomes. Significant social, environmental and economic constraints are also identified that negatively affect the sustainability of aquaculture. Findings presented have important policy implications and make novel contributions to the on-going debate concerning aquaculture’s future and its role to food security.
University of Southampton
Simmance, Alison
899dd178-a011-499b-b9d2-60e0f4651ef8
Simmance, Alison
899dd178-a011-499b-b9d2-60e0f4651ef8
Madise, Nyovani J
2ea2fbcc-50da-4696-a0a5-2fe01db63d8c

Simmance, Alison (2017) Sustainable livelihoods: the role of small-scale aquaculture to food security in Malawi. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 389pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The rapid rise and evolution of aquaculture over the past few decades has led to both optimism and apprehension regarding the sector’s sustainability and role to food security. Comprised predominantly of small-scale operators, the sector is recognised to play a critical role in supporting livelihoods, contributing to food security and alleviating poverty. However, the ability to achieve these potential benefits is not a given and the transformation of communities adopting aquaculture can be positive, neutral or negative. Assessing the sectors contribution in a systematic way has been an uphill challenge due to the typical part-time and dynamic temporal engagement of operators as well as the complex socio-ecological factors that mediate aquaculture development outcomes. Moreover, the multidimensional concept of food security presents challenges to the assessment of the role of aquaculture to food security. The aim of this thesis is to explore and assess the role of small-scale aquaculture to food security. This thesis adopts a mixed methods approach and is guided by the Sustainable Livelihoods Approach framework. This thesis’s contribution to the debate focuses on Malawi, a country where the potential for aquaculture development is reported considerable. Drawing on mixed qualitative and quantitative methods, overall findings reveal that small-scale aquaculture contributes marginally but positively to local livelihoods through complex pathways to improved food security, improved well-being and reduced vulnerability. However, the type of aquaculture development, gender relations and cultural norms shape development outcomes. Significant social, environmental and economic constraints are also identified that negatively affect the sustainability of aquaculture. Findings presented have important policy implications and make novel contributions to the on-going debate concerning aquaculture’s future and its role to food security.

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Published date: September 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430800
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430800
PURE UUID: 43338e24-d4c1-41d6-8e47-cada5604ec14
ORCID for Nyovani J Madise: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2813-5295

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 13 May 2019 16:30

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Contributors

Author: Alison Simmance
Thesis advisor: Nyovani J Madise ORCID iD

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