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A multi image-based approach for modelling plant-fertiliser interaction

A multi image-based approach for modelling plant-fertiliser interaction
A multi image-based approach for modelling plant-fertiliser interaction
Phosphorus fertilisation is crucial for crop yields. However, traditional phosphate resources are dwindling, thus a more efficient use of phosphorus fertilisers is required for sustainable farming. This study demonstrates the scope of image-based models parameterised by elemental maps by assessing how a dynamic root system architecture may improve phosphorus root uptake from a fertiliser pellet. A multi-image based modelling method was developed by utilising structural imaging coupled with elemental maps. Structural imaging was used to capture barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Optic) root, soil and fertiliser pellet configurations as a domain for numerical simulations. Elemental mapping was to image phosphorus in soil thin-sections of the same samples. These two imaging modes were aligned using an automated method and image-based models describing the diffusion and root-uptake of phosphorus in soil were parametrised using the elemental maps. Structural imaging showed root length density was increased inside and near the fertiliser pellet. Averaging elemental data revealed phosphorus gradients from the pellet. Modelling results suggested: the pellet only enhances phosphorus uptake of roots within 2 mm over 30 days, densely packed roots decrease phosphorus uptake efficiency, and a root system that responded to nutrients from a fertiliser have comparatively increased phosphorus uptake efficiency near the pellet. The combination of structural and elemental imaging provides the means to accurately parameterise both the geometric and chemical aspects of models describing phosphorus movement in root-soil-fertiliser systems. This approach may be applicable to other plant-soil systems where structure and elemental quantities are important to the problem.
Image-based modelling, X-ray CT, SEM-EDS, 2D-3D image alignment, elemental mapping, phosphorus
2452-2198
McKay Fletcher, Daniel, Marcus
60e9adeb-182b-4dfd-846a-b684f8e2358e
Keyes, Samuel
ed3ee62b-e257-4b92-922c-023b232e8145
Daly, Keith
29920932-1779-4d08-81f8-bdd898191e5a
Van Veelen, Arjen
cb6f2c8b-4671-4836-88a0-3987fd2f2d67
Roose, Tiina
3581ab5b-71e1-4897-8d88-59f13f3bccfe
McKay Fletcher, Daniel, Marcus
60e9adeb-182b-4dfd-846a-b684f8e2358e
Keyes, Samuel
ed3ee62b-e257-4b92-922c-023b232e8145
Daly, Keith
29920932-1779-4d08-81f8-bdd898191e5a
Van Veelen, Arjen
cb6f2c8b-4671-4836-88a0-3987fd2f2d67
Roose, Tiina
3581ab5b-71e1-4897-8d88-59f13f3bccfe

McKay Fletcher, Daniel, Marcus, Keyes, Samuel, Daly, Keith, Van Veelen, Arjen and Roose, Tiina (2019) A multi image-based approach for modelling plant-fertiliser interaction. Rhizosphere, 10, [100152]. (doi:10.1016/j.rhisph.2019.100152).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Phosphorus fertilisation is crucial for crop yields. However, traditional phosphate resources are dwindling, thus a more efficient use of phosphorus fertilisers is required for sustainable farming. This study demonstrates the scope of image-based models parameterised by elemental maps by assessing how a dynamic root system architecture may improve phosphorus root uptake from a fertiliser pellet. A multi-image based modelling method was developed by utilising structural imaging coupled with elemental maps. Structural imaging was used to capture barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Optic) root, soil and fertiliser pellet configurations as a domain for numerical simulations. Elemental mapping was to image phosphorus in soil thin-sections of the same samples. These two imaging modes were aligned using an automated method and image-based models describing the diffusion and root-uptake of phosphorus in soil were parametrised using the elemental maps. Structural imaging showed root length density was increased inside and near the fertiliser pellet. Averaging elemental data revealed phosphorus gradients from the pellet. Modelling results suggested: the pellet only enhances phosphorus uptake of roots within 2 mm over 30 days, densely packed roots decrease phosphorus uptake efficiency, and a root system that responded to nutrients from a fertiliser have comparatively increased phosphorus uptake efficiency near the pellet. The combination of structural and elemental imaging provides the means to accurately parameterise both the geometric and chemical aspects of models describing phosphorus movement in root-soil-fertiliser systems. This approach may be applicable to other plant-soil systems where structure and elemental quantities are important to the problem.

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imaging_chemical_modelling_Accepted-TR-02-05-2019 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2 May 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 May 2019
Published date: June 2019
Keywords: Image-based modelling, X-ray CT, SEM-EDS, 2D-3D image alignment, elemental mapping, phosphorus

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430808
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430808
ISSN: 2452-2198
PURE UUID: b0bfd775-66f1-4544-970f-77abbbb1ba4e
ORCID for Samuel Keyes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4129-2228
ORCID for Tiina Roose: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8710-1063

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 07:11

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Contributors

Author: Samuel Keyes ORCID iD
Author: Keith Daly
Author: Arjen Van Veelen
Author: Tiina Roose ORCID iD

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