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Seeing degree zero: Barthes / Burgin and Political Aesthetics

Seeing degree zero: Barthes / Burgin and Political Aesthetics
Seeing degree zero: Barthes / Burgin and Political Aesthetics
In the fields of literature and the visual arts, 'zero degree' represents a neutral aesthetic situated in response to, and outside of, the dominant cultural order. Taking Roland Barthes’ 1953 book Writing Degree Zero as just one starting point, this volume examines the historical, theoretical and visual impact of the term and draws directly upon the editors’ ongoing collaboration with artist and writer Victor Burgin.

The book is composed of key chapters by the editors and Burgin, a series of collaborative texts with Burgin and four commissioned essays concerned with the relationship between Barthes and Burgin in the context of the spectatorship of art. It includes an in-depth dialogue regarding Burgin’s long-term reading of Barthes and a lengthy image-text, offering critical exploration of the Image (in echo of earlier theories of the Text). Also included are translations of two projections works by Burgin, Belledonne and Prairie, which work alongside and inform the collected essays. Overall, the book provides a combined reading of both Barthes and Burgin, which in turn leads to new considerations of visual culture, the spectatorship of art and the political aesthetic.
critica theory, painting, Roland Barthes, Victor Burgin, drawing, zero degree
Edinburgh University Press
Manghani, Sunil
75650a9a-458d-4e1a-9480-94491300e385
Bishop, Ryan
a4f07e31-14a0-44c4-a599-5ed96567a2e1
Manghani, Sunil
75650a9a-458d-4e1a-9480-94491300e385
Bishop, Ryan
a4f07e31-14a0-44c4-a599-5ed96567a2e1

Manghani, Sunil and Bishop, Ryan (eds.) (2019) Seeing degree zero: Barthes / Burgin and Political Aesthetics , Edinburgh. Edinburgh University Press, 248pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

In the fields of literature and the visual arts, 'zero degree' represents a neutral aesthetic situated in response to, and outside of, the dominant cultural order. Taking Roland Barthes’ 1953 book Writing Degree Zero as just one starting point, this volume examines the historical, theoretical and visual impact of the term and draws directly upon the editors’ ongoing collaboration with artist and writer Victor Burgin.

The book is composed of key chapters by the editors and Burgin, a series of collaborative texts with Burgin and four commissioned essays concerned with the relationship between Barthes and Burgin in the context of the spectatorship of art. It includes an in-depth dialogue regarding Burgin’s long-term reading of Barthes and a lengthy image-text, offering critical exploration of the Image (in echo of earlier theories of the Text). Also included are translations of two projections works by Burgin, Belledonne and Prairie, which work alongside and inform the collected essays. Overall, the book provides a combined reading of both Barthes and Burgin, which in turn leads to new considerations of visual culture, the spectatorship of art and the political aesthetic.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 31 March 2019
Additional Information: Sunil Manghani is Professor of Theory, Practice and Critique at Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton
Keywords: critica theory, painting, Roland Barthes, Victor Burgin, drawing, zero degree

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430847
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430847
PURE UUID: b21b7180-c13a-4ff1-9638-0042b4c191f3

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 16 May 2019 16:30

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