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Impact of CPAP with humidification on the skin/mask interface microclimate and inflammatory response

Impact of CPAP with humidification on the skin/mask interface microclimate and inflammatory response
Impact of CPAP with humidification on the skin/mask interface microclimate and inflammatory response
Background: Excessive humidity increases the possibility of skin damage from shear, due to the increase in the skin's coefficient of friction. Aims and objectives: This study examined the effects of humidified and non-humidified CPAP on interface microclimate and inflammatory response at the skin surface. Methods: A crossover cohort design was used in this study, with 15 healthy volunteers serving as their own controls, in a random order assigned for both 10 cmH2O of CPAP with humidification, and without through an oronasal mask. Pre- and post-CPAP measurements of device-skin microclimate (humidity and temperature) were collected at the bridge of the nose and both cheeks. The pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin 1α (IL-1α) released by skin was collected from the bridge of the nose pre-and post-CPAP application using Sebutape. Results: There were statistically significant differences in skin humidity between the two conditions (p<0.02) (see figure 1), with no significant differences were found in skin temperature. There were higher mean ratios of IL-1α concentrations between baseline and post-CPAP values in the humidified CPAP compared to non-humidified condition (1.87 ±2.16; 1.29 ±1.28). Conclusion: These findings show that humidification use with CPAP is associated with significant changes in skin humidity with higher mean ratios of IL-1α released by skin.
0903-1936
Alqahtani, Jaber
1b64f1a5-b742-4d95-a605-2493856180ad
Worsley, Peter
44bc022c-0bea-4df9-bfb7-f3469992bfa1
Voegeli, David
e6f5d112-55b0-40c1-a6ad-8929a2d84a10
Alqahtani, Jaber
1b64f1a5-b742-4d95-a605-2493856180ad
Worsley, Peter
44bc022c-0bea-4df9-bfb7-f3469992bfa1
Voegeli, David
e6f5d112-55b0-40c1-a6ad-8929a2d84a10

Alqahtani, Jaber, Worsley, Peter and Voegeli, David (2017) Impact of CPAP with humidification on the skin/mask interface microclimate and inflammatory response. European Respiratory Journal, 50 (supplement 61), [PA2173]. (doi:10.1183/1393003.congress-2017.pa2173).

Record type: Meeting abstract

Abstract

Background: Excessive humidity increases the possibility of skin damage from shear, due to the increase in the skin's coefficient of friction. Aims and objectives: This study examined the effects of humidified and non-humidified CPAP on interface microclimate and inflammatory response at the skin surface. Methods: A crossover cohort design was used in this study, with 15 healthy volunteers serving as their own controls, in a random order assigned for both 10 cmH2O of CPAP with humidification, and without through an oronasal mask. Pre- and post-CPAP measurements of device-skin microclimate (humidity and temperature) were collected at the bridge of the nose and both cheeks. The pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin 1α (IL-1α) released by skin was collected from the bridge of the nose pre-and post-CPAP application using Sebutape. Results: There were statistically significant differences in skin humidity between the two conditions (p<0.02) (see figure 1), with no significant differences were found in skin temperature. There were higher mean ratios of IL-1α concentrations between baseline and post-CPAP values in the humidified CPAP compared to non-humidified condition (1.87 ±2.16; 1.29 ±1.28). Conclusion: These findings show that humidification use with CPAP is associated with significant changes in skin humidity with higher mean ratios of IL-1α released by skin.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 6 December 2017
Published date: 19 December 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430888
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430888
ISSN: 0903-1936
PURE UUID: 6ff1a420-3805-48f9-b6c0-270b101c9ae5
ORCID for David Voegeli: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3457-7177

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 11 May 2020 16:30

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