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Dense quantum measurement theory

Dense quantum measurement theory
Dense quantum measurement theory

Quantum measurement is a fundamental cornerstone of experimental quantum computations. The main issues in current quantum measurement strategies are the high number of measurement rounds to determine a global optimal measurement output and the low success probability of finding a global optimal measurement output. Each measurement round requires preparing the quantum system and applying quantum operations and measurements with high-precision control in the physical layer. These issues result in extremely high-cost measurements with a low probability of success at the end of the measurement rounds. Here, we define a novel measurement for quantum computations called dense quantum measurement. The dense measurement strategy aims at fixing the main drawbacks of standard quantum measurements by achieving a significant reduction in the number of necessary measurement rounds and by radically improving the success probabilities of finding global optimal outputs. We provide application scenarios for quantum circuits with arbitrary unitary sequences, and prove that dense measurement theory provides an experimentally implementable solution for gate-model quantum computer architectures.

2045-2322
Gyongyosi, Laszlo
bbfffd90-dfa2-4a08-b5f9-98376b8d6803
Imre, Sandor
2def242c-1cb7-4b12-8a16-351a5a36e041
Gyongyosi, Laszlo
bbfffd90-dfa2-4a08-b5f9-98376b8d6803
Imre, Sandor
2def242c-1cb7-4b12-8a16-351a5a36e041

Gyongyosi, Laszlo and Imre, Sandor (2019) Dense quantum measurement theory. Scientific Reports, 9 (1), [6755]. (doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43250-2).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Quantum measurement is a fundamental cornerstone of experimental quantum computations. The main issues in current quantum measurement strategies are the high number of measurement rounds to determine a global optimal measurement output and the low success probability of finding a global optimal measurement output. Each measurement round requires preparing the quantum system and applying quantum operations and measurements with high-precision control in the physical layer. These issues result in extremely high-cost measurements with a low probability of success at the end of the measurement rounds. Here, we define a novel measurement for quantum computations called dense quantum measurement. The dense measurement strategy aims at fixing the main drawbacks of standard quantum measurements by achieving a significant reduction in the number of necessary measurement rounds and by radically improving the success probabilities of finding global optimal outputs. We provide application scenarios for quantum circuits with arbitrary unitary sequences, and prove that dense measurement theory provides an experimentally implementable solution for gate-model quantum computer architectures.

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s41598-019-43250-2 - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 April 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 May 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430891
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430891
ISSN: 2045-2322
PURE UUID: 245789a3-1e83-4e0f-bef5-5bb9d3165656

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 16 Dec 2019 17:37

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Contributors

Author: Laszlo Gyongyosi
Author: Sandor Imre

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