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The effects of a situated-demonstration-based listening strategy instruction initiative on the development of EFL listening comprehension skills

The effects of a situated-demonstration-based listening strategy instruction initiative on the development of EFL listening comprehension skills
The effects of a situated-demonstration-based listening strategy instruction initiative on the development of EFL listening comprehension skills
Listening comprehension is an important part of language learning, and language learning strategies (LLS) are the behaviors or actions that can contribute to a more successful, self-directed language learning. In the research into language learning strategies, O’Malley and Chamot (1990) focus on language learning processes. Oxford (1990) talks about what teachers should know to help students become more active, self-directed and effective learners. Griffiths (2007) focusses on knowledge of strategies that is important for teachers. However, we know little about the teachers’ role in developing the language learning strategies that help students with their listening comprehension improvement. In this intervention study, the involvement of teachers in the intervention design is central. It is a situated demonstration approach to listening strategy instruction, where the teacher demonstrates strategies rather than tells students what to do.

Based on the SILL (Oxford, 1990), the researcher collaborated with the experimental group’s teacher to design a booklet which guided the teacher in demonstrating listening strategies within routine listening tasks. An experimental group of 74 students underwent the programme lasting 3 months. The control group (n=72), taught by a similarly experienced teacher in another university, had a conventional listening comprehension programme. The impact of the situated demonstration approach to listening strategy instruction on English listening comprehension performance was measured by tests, self-reports on strategy use, and self-efficacy questionnaires. All the students were given reference numbers in order to track their progress, and their experience across the data sets. As hypothesized, the experimental group significantly outperformed the control group on the final comprehension measure after controlling for initial variables. In addition, the quantitative results of the questionnaire provide the further details of the most frequently used metacognitive and cognitive strategies that underpinned successful L2 listening. Moreover, the outcome of the innovative strategy instruction was also found to contribute to the development of self-efficacy, and to higher perceived value of the listening comprehension training in the experimental group.

This study is one of the first that is embedded in and integrated into the teacher’s work and regular classroom materials. It suggests that it is important to research classroom practices and teachers in developing the potential of our understanding of language learning strategy development and use (not just student awareness and attitudes). Moreover, it emphases the importance of teacher education and development for the LLS in the curriculum. Students may not benefit from LLS training separate from classroom teaching, as much as from an LLS focus as part of the normal teaching activity of teachers.
University of Southampton
Lu, Yujing
76c4c9e1-3db2-47a9-beb3-9286bf79bb5a
Lu, Yujing
76c4c9e1-3db2-47a9-beb3-9286bf79bb5a
Kiely, Richard
2321c0cb-faf6-41e2-b044-2c3933e93d6e
Demossier, Marion
0a637e19-027f-4b47-9f4e-e693c6a8519e

Lu, Yujing (2018) The effects of a situated-demonstration-based listening strategy instruction initiative on the development of EFL listening comprehension skills. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 240pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Listening comprehension is an important part of language learning, and language learning strategies (LLS) are the behaviors or actions that can contribute to a more successful, self-directed language learning. In the research into language learning strategies, O’Malley and Chamot (1990) focus on language learning processes. Oxford (1990) talks about what teachers should know to help students become more active, self-directed and effective learners. Griffiths (2007) focusses on knowledge of strategies that is important for teachers. However, we know little about the teachers’ role in developing the language learning strategies that help students with their listening comprehension improvement. In this intervention study, the involvement of teachers in the intervention design is central. It is a situated demonstration approach to listening strategy instruction, where the teacher demonstrates strategies rather than tells students what to do.

Based on the SILL (Oxford, 1990), the researcher collaborated with the experimental group’s teacher to design a booklet which guided the teacher in demonstrating listening strategies within routine listening tasks. An experimental group of 74 students underwent the programme lasting 3 months. The control group (n=72), taught by a similarly experienced teacher in another university, had a conventional listening comprehension programme. The impact of the situated demonstration approach to listening strategy instruction on English listening comprehension performance was measured by tests, self-reports on strategy use, and self-efficacy questionnaires. All the students were given reference numbers in order to track their progress, and their experience across the data sets. As hypothesized, the experimental group significantly outperformed the control group on the final comprehension measure after controlling for initial variables. In addition, the quantitative results of the questionnaire provide the further details of the most frequently used metacognitive and cognitive strategies that underpinned successful L2 listening. Moreover, the outcome of the innovative strategy instruction was also found to contribute to the development of self-efficacy, and to higher perceived value of the listening comprehension training in the experimental group.

This study is one of the first that is embedded in and integrated into the teacher’s work and regular classroom materials. It suggests that it is important to research classroom practices and teachers in developing the potential of our understanding of language learning strategy development and use (not just student awareness and attitudes). Moreover, it emphases the importance of teacher education and development for the LLS in the curriculum. Students may not benefit from LLS training separate from classroom teaching, as much as from an LLS focus as part of the normal teaching activity of teachers.

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PhD thesis-Yujing Lu - Version of Record
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Published date: September 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 431085
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/431085
PURE UUID: 9a4d0d64-94b9-494d-96e2-ac10c0209edf
ORCID for Marion Demossier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6075-1461

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 19 Nov 2019 01:39

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Contributors

Author: Yujing Lu
Thesis advisor: Richard Kiely
Thesis advisor: Marion Demossier ORCID iD

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