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RRS James Cook Cruise 166-167, 19 June – 6 July 2018. Haig Fras Marine Conservation Zone AUV habitat monitoring, equipment trials and staff training

RRS James Cook Cruise 166-167, 19 June – 6 July 2018. Haig Fras Marine Conservation Zone AUV habitat monitoring, equipment trials and staff training
RRS James Cook Cruise 166-167, 19 June – 6 July 2018. Haig Fras Marine Conservation Zone AUV habitat monitoring, equipment trials and staff training
Expedition JC166-167 combined a number of science and technical objectives in order to deliver a comprehensive programme for the UK marine science sector. The expedition supported the NERC National Capability programme CLASS (Climate-Linked Atlantic Sector Science, grant no NE/R015953/1), which aims to increase our understanding of the Atlantic Ocean system, in order to support evidence-based ocean management. More specifically, JC166-167 was part of the Fixed Point Observations Underpinning Activity, where repeated observations and surveys of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and their surroundings provide insight into the development and recovery of benthic ecosystems following natural and/or anthropogenic impacts.
The target location for JC166-167 was the Greater Haig Fras Marine Conservation Zone (MCZ), west of Cornwall, which was surveyed by NOC, using Autosub AUVs, in 2012 and 2015. The 2018 expedition continued that time series, and expanded the study by also looking at differences in benthic community observed between day and night. Haig Fras is the only rocky reef on the Celtic Shelf, and was protected in 2016.
In parallel with these science objectives, JC166-167 included an extensive series of equipment trials, combined with training for staff members of the Marine Autonomous and Robotic Systems group at NOC. The robotic and autonomous systems tested included the Isis ROV, HyBIS vehicle, the Autosub6000 AUV, a deep glider, a wave glider, a C-worker 4 USV and a drone. Some of the trials were carried out in the shallow waters around Haig Fras, while others required greater depths, for which we visited the Whittard Canyon system along the Celtic Margin. Wherever possible, trials and training were carried out in a way that the resulting data would help address CLASS science objectives, including objectives related to the sustained observations in the Canyons MCZ.
56
National Oceanography Centre
Huvenne, Veerle
f22be3e2-708c-491b-b985-a438470fa053
Furlong, Maaten
332e9aef-8c6b-452f-8b85-712492767458
Huvenne, Veerle
f22be3e2-708c-491b-b985-a438470fa053
Furlong, Maaten
332e9aef-8c6b-452f-8b85-712492767458

Huvenne, Veerle and Furlong, Maaten (2019) RRS James Cook Cruise 166-167, 19 June – 6 July 2018. Haig Fras Marine Conservation Zone AUV habitat monitoring, equipment trials and staff training (National Oceanography Centre Cruise Report, 56) National Oceanography Centre 152pp.

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

Expedition JC166-167 combined a number of science and technical objectives in order to deliver a comprehensive programme for the UK marine science sector. The expedition supported the NERC National Capability programme CLASS (Climate-Linked Atlantic Sector Science, grant no NE/R015953/1), which aims to increase our understanding of the Atlantic Ocean system, in order to support evidence-based ocean management. More specifically, JC166-167 was part of the Fixed Point Observations Underpinning Activity, where repeated observations and surveys of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and their surroundings provide insight into the development and recovery of benthic ecosystems following natural and/or anthropogenic impacts.
The target location for JC166-167 was the Greater Haig Fras Marine Conservation Zone (MCZ), west of Cornwall, which was surveyed by NOC, using Autosub AUVs, in 2012 and 2015. The 2018 expedition continued that time series, and expanded the study by also looking at differences in benthic community observed between day and night. Haig Fras is the only rocky reef on the Celtic Shelf, and was protected in 2016.
In parallel with these science objectives, JC166-167 included an extensive series of equipment trials, combined with training for staff members of the Marine Autonomous and Robotic Systems group at NOC. The robotic and autonomous systems tested included the Isis ROV, HyBIS vehicle, the Autosub6000 AUV, a deep glider, a wave glider, a C-worker 4 USV and a drone. Some of the trials were carried out in the shallow waters around Haig Fras, while others required greater depths, for which we visited the Whittard Canyon system along the Celtic Margin. Wherever possible, trials and training were carried out in a way that the resulting data would help address CLASS science objectives, including objectives related to the sustained observations in the Canyons MCZ.

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Published date: 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 431120
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/431120
PURE UUID: 4b1b0b8c-d786-4eef-be8a-e80eda900922
ORCID for Veerle Huvenne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7135-6360

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Date deposited: 24 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 11 Aug 2020 01:35

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