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Microbial film formation: dental plaque deposition on acrylic tiles using continuous culture techniques

Microbial film formation: dental plaque deposition on acrylic tiles using continuous culture techniques
Microbial film formation: dental plaque deposition on acrylic tiles using continuous culture techniques

A chemostat system has been developed to model the attachment of oral bacteria, and the subsequent development of plaque film, to acrylic surfaces immersed in steady state cultures. Plaque was removed from the teeth and gingival margin of volunteers who refrained from oral hygiene for at least 72 h. Samples were pooled and inoculated into a complex growth medium maintained at 37C. Glucose‐limited continuous culture was established at a dilution rate of 005/h and at pH 70. Microbiological analysis of the culture indicated that a complex community of oral bacteria was established, typical of that found in dental plaque. Acrylic tiles were immersed in the fermenter through a modified fermenter head and incubated therein for up to 21 d. Scanning electron microscopy showed that either side of the tiles contained a rough and a smooth surface and these initially favoured the attachment of fusiform bacteria, particularly on the rough surface. Cocci attached to those surfaces which were not heavily colonized by the fusiforms and eventually grew into and on the colonial sheets of the fusiforms.

0021-8847
129-138
Keevil, C. W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Bradshaw, D. J.
ede5c2d2-d21c-49b8-951a-7db8ce4bec2c
Dowsett, A. B.
fb65d746-cf78-4004-8773-9858a4e4f01c
Feary, T. W.
fc9fcda8-06ea-48d2-a366-a9f5b99de049
Keevil, C. W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Bradshaw, D. J.
ede5c2d2-d21c-49b8-951a-7db8ce4bec2c
Dowsett, A. B.
fb65d746-cf78-4004-8773-9858a4e4f01c
Feary, T. W.
fc9fcda8-06ea-48d2-a366-a9f5b99de049

Keevil, C. W., Bradshaw, D. J., Dowsett, A. B. and Feary, T. W. (1987) Microbial film formation: dental plaque deposition on acrylic tiles using continuous culture techniques. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 62 (2), 129-138. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2672.1987.tb02390.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A chemostat system has been developed to model the attachment of oral bacteria, and the subsequent development of plaque film, to acrylic surfaces immersed in steady state cultures. Plaque was removed from the teeth and gingival margin of volunteers who refrained from oral hygiene for at least 72 h. Samples were pooled and inoculated into a complex growth medium maintained at 37C. Glucose‐limited continuous culture was established at a dilution rate of 005/h and at pH 70. Microbiological analysis of the culture indicated that a complex community of oral bacteria was established, typical of that found in dental plaque. Acrylic tiles were immersed in the fermenter through a modified fermenter head and incubated therein for up to 21 d. Scanning electron microscopy showed that either side of the tiles contained a rough and a smooth surface and these initially favoured the attachment of fusiform bacteria, particularly on the rough surface. Cocci attached to those surfaces which were not heavily colonized by the fusiforms and eventually grew into and on the colonial sheets of the fusiforms.

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Published date: February 1987

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 431325
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/431325
ISSN: 0021-8847
PURE UUID: 0413360b-67e3-44b7-bfcb-0366305f97ed
ORCID for C. W. Keevil: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1917-7706

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Date deposited: 29 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 30 May 2019 00:36

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