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Enhanced growth of complex communities of dental plaque bacteria in mucin-limited continuous culture

Enhanced growth of complex communities of dental plaque bacteria in mucin-limited continuous culture
Enhanced growth of complex communities of dental plaque bacteria in mucin-limited continuous culture

The possibility that bacteria in plaque can grow at rates which are unaffected by the availability of dietary foods, because of their ability to metabolise salivary proteins, has been investigated by Keevil et al. using an in vitro continuous culture model. Plaque was collected aseptically from 13 school children, pooled and inoculated into a chemostat containing complex medium plus glucose. The principal genera enriched during growth at dilution rates of 005 and 0.2 h-1 (corresponding to mean generation times of 13.9 and 3.5 h, respectively, which might occur in vivo) were streptococci (including Streptococcus mutans) peptostreptococci, lactobacilli, fusiforms, veillonellae and Bacteroides spp. Addition of 0.1 per cent (w/v) mucin resulted in an increased growth yield, due to increases in the numbers of anaerobes, but the recovery of peptostreptococci and veillonellae decreased. Importantly, Actinomyces spp. increased and the appearance of spirochaetes was noted in all cultures fed with mucin. Withdrawal of glucose from mucin supplemented complex medium resulted in decreased growth yield, the loss of Neisseria spp. and decreased recovery of streptococci and lactobacilli. Replacement of the medium with artificial saliva containing 0.1 per cent (w/v) mucin enriched for Bacteroides spp., but lower numbers of the other genera found in plaque were also maintained at both growth rates. This suggests that the chemostat can be used successfully to model the oral ecosystem, with salivary proteins providing the principal source of carbon and nitrogen for growth.

Enrichment of complex microbial communities, Mucin enrichment, Mucin-limited continuous culture, Plaque bacteria
0891-060X
31-38
Glenister, D. A.
6992ac98-e915-4ee0-8cd6-c977c9f00d69
Salamon, Katja E.
80ea0367-9180-4e01-977c-c8a34b178a68
Smith, K.
a2e75daf-e60c-4548-a4f4-0b2394ffc04a
Beighton, D.
b7845cb5-abb4-421e-9695-78cc6bef1e60
Keevil, C. W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Glenister, D. A.
6992ac98-e915-4ee0-8cd6-c977c9f00d69
Salamon, Katja E.
80ea0367-9180-4e01-977c-c8a34b178a68
Smith, K.
a2e75daf-e60c-4548-a4f4-0b2394ffc04a
Beighton, D.
b7845cb5-abb4-421e-9695-78cc6bef1e60
Keevil, C. W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb

Glenister, D. A., Salamon, Katja E., Smith, K., Beighton, D. and Keevil, C. W. (1988) Enhanced growth of complex communities of dental plaque bacteria in mucin-limited continuous culture. Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease, 1 (1), 31-38. (doi:10.3109/08910608809140176).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The possibility that bacteria in plaque can grow at rates which are unaffected by the availability of dietary foods, because of their ability to metabolise salivary proteins, has been investigated by Keevil et al. using an in vitro continuous culture model. Plaque was collected aseptically from 13 school children, pooled and inoculated into a chemostat containing complex medium plus glucose. The principal genera enriched during growth at dilution rates of 005 and 0.2 h-1 (corresponding to mean generation times of 13.9 and 3.5 h, respectively, which might occur in vivo) were streptococci (including Streptococcus mutans) peptostreptococci, lactobacilli, fusiforms, veillonellae and Bacteroides spp. Addition of 0.1 per cent (w/v) mucin resulted in an increased growth yield, due to increases in the numbers of anaerobes, but the recovery of peptostreptococci and veillonellae decreased. Importantly, Actinomyces spp. increased and the appearance of spirochaetes was noted in all cultures fed with mucin. Withdrawal of glucose from mucin supplemented complex medium resulted in decreased growth yield, the loss of Neisseria spp. and decreased recovery of streptococci and lactobacilli. Replacement of the medium with artificial saliva containing 0.1 per cent (w/v) mucin enriched for Bacteroides spp., but lower numbers of the other genera found in plaque were also maintained at both growth rates. This suggests that the chemostat can be used successfully to model the oral ecosystem, with salivary proteins providing the principal source of carbon and nitrogen for growth.

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More information

Published date: 1 January 1988
Keywords: Enrichment of complex microbial communities, Mucin enrichment, Mucin-limited continuous culture, Plaque bacteria

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 431327
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/431327
ISSN: 0891-060X
PURE UUID: e80c552c-f421-41f7-a718-2bcbcc378568
ORCID for C. W. Keevil: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1917-7706

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 30 May 2019 00:36

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