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Periconceptional environment and the developmental origins of disease

Periconceptional environment and the developmental origins of disease
Periconceptional environment and the developmental origins of disease

The concept emerging from Professor David Barker’s seminal research on the developmental origins of later-life disease has progressed in many directions since it was first published. One critical question being when during gestation might environment alter the developmental programme with such enduring consequences. Here, we review the growing consensus from clinical and animal research that the period around conception, embracing gamete maturation and early embryogenesis might be the most vulnerable period. We focus on four types of environmental exposure shown to modify periconceptional reproduction and offspring development and health: maternal overnutrition and obesity; maternal undernutrition; paternal diet and health; and assisted reproductive technology. These conditions may act through diverse epigenetic, cellular and physiological mechanisms to alter gene expression and cellular signalling and function in the conceptus affecting offspring growth and metabolism leading to increased risk for cardiometabolic and neurological disease in later life.

0022-0795
T33-T49
Velazquez, Miguel A.
3b67a037-eed3-4268-92f8-7a4b58473472
Fleming, Tom P.
2abf761a-e5a1-4fa7-a2c8-12e32d5d4c03
Watkins, Adam J.
0750048a-a19b-4a4e-9fb2-de46770d891b
Velazquez, Miguel A.
3b67a037-eed3-4268-92f8-7a4b58473472
Fleming, Tom P.
2abf761a-e5a1-4fa7-a2c8-12e32d5d4c03
Watkins, Adam J.
0750048a-a19b-4a4e-9fb2-de46770d891b

Velazquez, Miguel A., Fleming, Tom P. and Watkins, Adam J. (2019) Periconceptional environment and the developmental origins of disease. Journal of Endocrinology, 242 (1), T33-T49. (doi:10.1530/JOE-18-0676).

Record type: Review

Abstract

The concept emerging from Professor David Barker’s seminal research on the developmental origins of later-life disease has progressed in many directions since it was first published. One critical question being when during gestation might environment alter the developmental programme with such enduring consequences. Here, we review the growing consensus from clinical and animal research that the period around conception, embracing gamete maturation and early embryogenesis might be the most vulnerable period. We focus on four types of environmental exposure shown to modify periconceptional reproduction and offspring development and health: maternal overnutrition and obesity; maternal undernutrition; paternal diet and health; and assisted reproductive technology. These conditions may act through diverse epigenetic, cellular and physiological mechanisms to alter gene expression and cellular signalling and function in the conceptus affecting offspring growth and metabolism leading to increased risk for cardiometabolic and neurological disease in later life.

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Accepted/In Press date: 1 February 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 February 2019
Published date: July 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 431635
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/431635
ISSN: 0022-0795
PURE UUID: 465e630a-752d-4f34-8802-a70453804322

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Jun 2019 16:30
Last modified: 14 Sep 2021 19:20

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