The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Women professors and the academic housework trap

Women professors and the academic housework trap
Women professors and the academic housework trap

Women constitute just over one fifth of full professors in UK higher education and whilst work has emerged in recent years on professors as leaders, there has been comparatively little research about how this under-represented cadre define and practise their role as intellectual leaders. This paper seeks to analyse how women see their role as full professors through autobiographical accounts of their intellectual and career histories via interviews with women professors, and a small comparison group of male professors. A range of freedoms and responsibilities connected with the professorial role are identified along with personal qualities considered central to success. Both female and male professors understand their role principally in terms of research leadership, but women are more likely to emphasise the importance of academic citizenship, especially mentoring, compared to their male counterparts, an obligation that weighs especially heavily on women working in science, technology, engineering and mathematics areas. While these findings are indicative of the continuing effect of so-called ‘academic housework’ in holding back the academic careers of women, they are also a positive indicator of a commitment to an all-round role as an intellectual leader.

academic citizenship, academic freedom, academic profession, Gender, service, women professors
1360-080X
262-274
Macfarlane, Bruce
3e2b9eb0-1772-4642-bb51-ab49cc5b748c
Burg, Damon
981c7e59-c69f-48b4-9a31-9423e628f983
Macfarlane, Bruce
3e2b9eb0-1772-4642-bb51-ab49cc5b748c
Burg, Damon
981c7e59-c69f-48b4-9a31-9423e628f983

Macfarlane, Bruce and Burg, Damon (2019) Women professors and the academic housework trap. Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 41 (3), 262-274. (doi:10.1080/1360080X.2019.1589682).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Women constitute just over one fifth of full professors in UK higher education and whilst work has emerged in recent years on professors as leaders, there has been comparatively little research about how this under-represented cadre define and practise their role as intellectual leaders. This paper seeks to analyse how women see their role as full professors through autobiographical accounts of their intellectual and career histories via interviews with women professors, and a small comparison group of male professors. A range of freedoms and responsibilities connected with the professorial role are identified along with personal qualities considered central to success. Both female and male professors understand their role principally in terms of research leadership, but women are more likely to emphasise the importance of academic citizenship, especially mentoring, compared to their male counterparts, an obligation that weighs especially heavily on women working in science, technology, engineering and mathematics areas. While these findings are indicative of the continuing effect of so-called ‘academic housework’ in holding back the academic careers of women, they are also a positive indicator of a commitment to an all-round role as an intellectual leader.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 23 March 2019
Keywords: academic citizenship, academic freedom, academic profession, Gender, service, women professors

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 431935
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/431935
ISSN: 1360-080X
PURE UUID: 6f7a5423-2cbe-4706-a53b-edf9ddfbe9a4

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Jun 2019 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 00:23

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×