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People with enteral tubes and their carers views of living with a tube and managing associated problems: a qualitative interview study

People with enteral tubes and their carers views of living with a tube and managing associated problems: a qualitative interview study
People with enteral tubes and their carers views of living with a tube and managing associated problems: a qualitative interview study
Background: nutrition by enteral tube is a complex therapy requiring significant management to ensure safe, timely delivery of nutrients and avoidance of complications. In the home setting people with enteral tubes and their carers are required to self-manage the therapy, including the need to cope with problems that arise. Whilst previous studies have conveyed experiences of people with enteral tubes, few have described views on enteral tube problems.

Aims and objectives: drawing on the findings of a previously reported study (1), this paper aims to describe in-depth the experiences of people with enteral tubes and their carers of living with the tube day to day and managing problems that arise.

Design: a qualitative descriptive design using semi-structured in-depth interviews was employed.

Methods: a purposive sample of 19 people with enteral tubes and 15 carers of people with tubes participated. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Using a thematic analysis approach, codes were defined and applied; themes developed and refined. Five themes with associated sub-themes were generated, of which one, “living with the tube”, is reported in-depth. The COREQ checklist was used.

Results: participants described the tube affecting both physical and psychosocial being and revealed it had resulted in significant changes to their daily living, necessitating adaptation to a new way of life. Participants reported spending much time and effort to manage tube problems, at times without support from healthcare practitioners knowledgeable in tube management. Discomfort associated with the tube was commonly described.

Conclusions: living with an enteral tube impacts significantly on daily life requiring adaptations to normal routine. People with tubes and their carers use a range of strategies to manage common complications.
0962-1067
3710-3720
Green, Susan
1075a760-2a75-443c-96c7-194d0d90ede8
Townsend, Kay
65d8a2d8-87e0-4b8b-b1e5-d42d671424d4
Jarrett, Nikki
acfc2414-c001-4fde-950d-b767fc7fa83d
Westoby, Catherine
f2316025-cf65-4c21-9324-ff7dc9e033c3
Fader, Miranda
c318f942-2ddb-462a-9183-8b678faf7277
Green, Susan
1075a760-2a75-443c-96c7-194d0d90ede8
Townsend, Kay
65d8a2d8-87e0-4b8b-b1e5-d42d671424d4
Jarrett, Nikki
acfc2414-c001-4fde-950d-b767fc7fa83d
Westoby, Catherine
f2316025-cf65-4c21-9324-ff7dc9e033c3
Fader, Miranda
c318f942-2ddb-462a-9183-8b678faf7277

Green, Susan, Townsend, Kay, Jarrett, Nikki, Westoby, Catherine and Fader, Miranda (2019) People with enteral tubes and their carers views of living with a tube and managing associated problems: a qualitative interview study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 28 (19-20), 3710-3720. (doi:10.1111/jocn.14972).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: nutrition by enteral tube is a complex therapy requiring significant management to ensure safe, timely delivery of nutrients and avoidance of complications. In the home setting people with enteral tubes and their carers are required to self-manage the therapy, including the need to cope with problems that arise. Whilst previous studies have conveyed experiences of people with enteral tubes, few have described views on enteral tube problems.

Aims and objectives: drawing on the findings of a previously reported study (1), this paper aims to describe in-depth the experiences of people with enteral tubes and their carers of living with the tube day to day and managing problems that arise.

Design: a qualitative descriptive design using semi-structured in-depth interviews was employed.

Methods: a purposive sample of 19 people with enteral tubes and 15 carers of people with tubes participated. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Using a thematic analysis approach, codes were defined and applied; themes developed and refined. Five themes with associated sub-themes were generated, of which one, “living with the tube”, is reported in-depth. The COREQ checklist was used.

Results: participants described the tube affecting both physical and psychosocial being and revealed it had resulted in significant changes to their daily living, necessitating adaptation to a new way of life. Participants reported spending much time and effort to manage tube problems, at times without support from healthcare practitioners knowledgeable in tube management. Discomfort associated with the tube was commonly described.

Conclusions: living with an enteral tube impacts significantly on daily life requiring adaptations to normal routine. People with tubes and their carers use a range of strategies to manage common complications.

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People with enteral tubes and their carers views of living with a tube and managing associated problems a qualitative interview study - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 June 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 June 2019
Published date: October 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432213
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432213
ISSN: 0962-1067
PURE UUID: 789109d1-2714-491f-911d-fce92891b342
ORCID for Susan Green: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1760-3679
ORCID for Kay Townsend: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2252-6447

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Date deposited: 04 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:57

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