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Identifying niche and fitness dissimilarities in invaded marine macroalgal canopies within the context of contemporary coexistence theory

Identifying niche and fitness dissimilarities in invaded marine macroalgal canopies within the context of contemporary coexistence theory
Identifying niche and fitness dissimilarities in invaded marine macroalgal canopies within the context of contemporary coexistence theory

Contemporary coexistence theory provides a framework for predicting invasiveness and impact of Invasive Non-Native Species (INNS) by incorporating differences in niche and fitness between INNS and co-occurring native species. The widespread invasive kelp Undaria pinnatifida is considered a high-risk INNS, although a robust evidence base regarding its invasiveness and impact is lacking in many regions. Invaded macroalgal canopies at nine coastal sites in the southwest UK were studied over three years to discern whether Undaria is coexisting or competing with native canopy-forming species across different habitat types. Spatial, temporal and depth-related trends in species distributions and abundance were recorded within intertidal and subtidal rocky reef as well as on marina pontoons. A primary succession experiment also examined competitive interactions between species. In rocky reef habitats, Undaria had lower fitness compared to long-lived native perennials, but was able to coexist due to niche dissimilarity between species. In contrast, Undaria was likely to be competing with short-lived native annuals on rocky reef due to large niche overlap and similar fitness. In marina habitats, Undaria dominated over all other canopy formers due to low niche diversification and higher fitness. Generalisations on INNS impact cannot be made across habitats or species, without considering many abiotic factors and biotic interactions.

2045-2322
1-13
Epstein, Graham
672bb3a6-6393-47c3-b119-06a073afbf41
Hawkins, Stephen J.
758fe1c1-30cd-4ed1-bb65-2471dc7c11fa
Smale, Dan A.
9be48b19-ad5f-4f40-87c8-e0bfa799584f
Epstein, Graham
672bb3a6-6393-47c3-b119-06a073afbf41
Hawkins, Stephen J.
758fe1c1-30cd-4ed1-bb65-2471dc7c11fa
Smale, Dan A.
9be48b19-ad5f-4f40-87c8-e0bfa799584f

Epstein, Graham, Hawkins, Stephen J. and Smale, Dan A. (2019) Identifying niche and fitness dissimilarities in invaded marine macroalgal canopies within the context of contemporary coexistence theory. Scientific Reports, 9 (1), 1-13. (doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45388-5).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Contemporary coexistence theory provides a framework for predicting invasiveness and impact of Invasive Non-Native Species (INNS) by incorporating differences in niche and fitness between INNS and co-occurring native species. The widespread invasive kelp Undaria pinnatifida is considered a high-risk INNS, although a robust evidence base regarding its invasiveness and impact is lacking in many regions. Invaded macroalgal canopies at nine coastal sites in the southwest UK were studied over three years to discern whether Undaria is coexisting or competing with native canopy-forming species across different habitat types. Spatial, temporal and depth-related trends in species distributions and abundance were recorded within intertidal and subtidal rocky reef as well as on marina pontoons. A primary succession experiment also examined competitive interactions between species. In rocky reef habitats, Undaria had lower fitness compared to long-lived native perennials, but was able to coexist due to niche dissimilarity between species. In contrast, Undaria was likely to be competing with short-lived native annuals on rocky reef due to large niche overlap and similar fitness. In marina habitats, Undaria dominated over all other canopy formers due to low niche diversification and higher fitness. Generalisations on INNS impact cannot be made across habitats or species, without considering many abiotic factors and biotic interactions.

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s41598-019-45388-5 - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 5 May 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 June 2019
Published date: 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432239
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432239
ISSN: 2045-2322
PURE UUID: 3500abd3-acb4-48ae-bda2-e4303104bdc8

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Date deposited: 05 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 30 Jul 2019 16:30

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Author: Graham Epstein
Author: Dan A. Smale

University divisions

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