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The effect of filler loading ratios and moisture on DC conductivity and space charge behaviour of SiO2 and hBN filled epoxy nanocomposites

The effect of filler loading ratios and moisture on DC conductivity and space charge behaviour of SiO2 and hBN filled epoxy nanocomposites
The effect of filler loading ratios and moisture on DC conductivity and space charge behaviour of SiO2 and hBN filled epoxy nanocomposites
Nanocomposites those exhibit good insulation properties have already attracted numbers of research and their electrical properties are believed to be related to charge dynamics in bulk of materials. However, it is still unclear on how nanofiller loading ratios, surface treatment and resultant changes in morphology influence the charge dynamics of nanocomposites. In this paper, we have clearly mentioned the influence of adding nanoparticles into epoxy resins and the characteristics of the movement of charges in the materials based on combining analysis on morphology, DC conductivity and space charge measurements. The presence of spherical nanoparticles (SiO2) introduced additional traps in bulk, which impaired the charge injection and reduced the mobility of charge carriers in samples of low filler loading ratios (e.g., 0.5 wt%). However, in silica-based samples of higher filler loadings, more nanoparticles further caused a higher density of traps, which resulted in lower average distance between arbitrary traps/ inter-particle surface distances and thus charge carriers required less energy when moving from one to another by hopping or the quantum tunnelling mechanism. The surface treatment of SiO2 particles introduced deep traps which helped the separation of particles or related traps, and to some extent restricted the transport of charge carriers. In addition, hBN particles seem to act as barriers to charge injection and movement due to the layered structures and large numbers of resultant shallow traps in bulk. In term of moisture effect, the presence of water led to an obvious increase in charge injection and mobility, and resulted in the higher mobility of charge carriers in both base materials and within traps/particles of nanocomposites. The existence of water shells around spherical particles could contribute to a higher probability of the quantum tunnelling process and the formation of conductive percolation channels.
0022-3727
1-16
Chen, Guanghui
3de45a9c-6c9a-4bcb-90c3-d7e26be21819
Qiang, Dayuan
2a64f637-fc33-4722-ab29-4e8fd60895a1
Wang, Yan
f64021d0-1658-417b-93a7-b59055bd76f9
Wang, Xinyu
b0de6d39-87db-4bda-a097-a8ec50804a4a
Andritsch, Thomas
8681e640-e584-424e-a1f1-0d8b713de01c
Chen, Guanghui
3de45a9c-6c9a-4bcb-90c3-d7e26be21819
Qiang, Dayuan
2a64f637-fc33-4722-ab29-4e8fd60895a1
Wang, Yan
f64021d0-1658-417b-93a7-b59055bd76f9
Wang, Xinyu
b0de6d39-87db-4bda-a097-a8ec50804a4a
Andritsch, Thomas
8681e640-e584-424e-a1f1-0d8b713de01c

Chen, Guanghui, Qiang, Dayuan, Wang, Yan, Wang, Xinyu and Andritsch, Thomas (2019) The effect of filler loading ratios and moisture on DC conductivity and space charge behaviour of SiO2 and hBN filled epoxy nanocomposites. Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, 52 (39), 1-16. (doi:10.1088/1361-6463/ab2d5b).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Nanocomposites those exhibit good insulation properties have already attracted numbers of research and their electrical properties are believed to be related to charge dynamics in bulk of materials. However, it is still unclear on how nanofiller loading ratios, surface treatment and resultant changes in morphology influence the charge dynamics of nanocomposites. In this paper, we have clearly mentioned the influence of adding nanoparticles into epoxy resins and the characteristics of the movement of charges in the materials based on combining analysis on morphology, DC conductivity and space charge measurements. The presence of spherical nanoparticles (SiO2) introduced additional traps in bulk, which impaired the charge injection and reduced the mobility of charge carriers in samples of low filler loading ratios (e.g., 0.5 wt%). However, in silica-based samples of higher filler loadings, more nanoparticles further caused a higher density of traps, which resulted in lower average distance between arbitrary traps/ inter-particle surface distances and thus charge carriers required less energy when moving from one to another by hopping or the quantum tunnelling mechanism. The surface treatment of SiO2 particles introduced deep traps which helped the separation of particles or related traps, and to some extent restricted the transport of charge carriers. In addition, hBN particles seem to act as barriers to charge injection and movement due to the layered structures and large numbers of resultant shallow traps in bulk. In term of moisture effect, the presence of water led to an obvious increase in charge injection and mobility, and resulted in the higher mobility of charge carriers in both base materials and within traps/particles of nanocomposites. The existence of water shells around spherical particles could contribute to a higher probability of the quantum tunnelling process and the formation of conductive percolation channels.

Text
Revised_JPhysD-120523_Darren - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 27 June 2020.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 June 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 July 2019
Published date: 25 September 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432311
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432311
ISSN: 0022-3727
PURE UUID: 22de8747-4d27-464e-9c38-0ce48d0fe9ac
ORCID for Xinyu Wang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9434-2906
ORCID for Thomas Andritsch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3462-022X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 23 Oct 2019 00:31

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