The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Heat response of unipolar lightning impulse and DC current component conducted through CFRP samples used for wind turbine sparcaps

Heat response of unipolar lightning impulse and DC current component conducted through CFRP samples used for wind turbine sparcaps
Heat response of unipolar lightning impulse and DC current component conducted through CFRP samples used for wind turbine sparcaps
Lightning protection of wind turbine blades has reached much attention due to the increased number of blade manufacturers now featuring blade designs that include conductive Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) composites for structural components. CFRP materials are stiff and lightweight, but exhibit material properties different from other conductive materials like metals, making them more susceptible to lightning damage. The weaknesses observed is governed by the limited electrical and thermal conductivity, transverse to the fibers, the anisotropic material properties, and the integration of the CFRP into the overall WT blade or aerospace structure.
This study investigates in detail the heat response on CFRP material exposed to two different components of a lightning strike; the unipolar impulse current and the direct current (DC). The first waveform examined is a unipolar 10/350µs waveform simulating the first return stroke during a direct strike according to IEC 61400-24 Ed1.0 , the second being a unipolar long stroke component also defined by the IEC standards. Both current components are tested using the conducted current test method provided in Annex D3.4 of IEC 61400-24 Ed1.01.
CFRP strips made with vacuum assisted liquid resin infusion were exposed to conducting currents as defined above using the two different waveforms. A PYROVIEW 640L IR camera was used to monitor the heat response of each sample. The data from the center of the sample was used to collect the heat response and the results can be seen in Figure 1 and Figure 2. This data helps determine thermal response models to help determine damage from thermal degradation due to electric current.
Harrell, T.M.
c97349b6-6f27-423d-b3d1-e35b30552692
Thomsen, O.T.
f3e60b22-a09f-4d58-90da-d58e37d68047
Dulieu-Barton, J.M.
9e35bebb-2185-4d16-a1bc-bb8f20e06632
Madsen, S.F.
ea8ee618-05d5-4c5e-85b4-d6ef7cc3b865
Carloni, L.
b70d68c0-1454-4ceb-ad68-7501d91ccb91
Harrell, T.M.
c97349b6-6f27-423d-b3d1-e35b30552692
Thomsen, O.T.
f3e60b22-a09f-4d58-90da-d58e37d68047
Dulieu-Barton, J.M.
9e35bebb-2185-4d16-a1bc-bb8f20e06632
Madsen, S.F.
ea8ee618-05d5-4c5e-85b4-d6ef7cc3b865
Carloni, L.
b70d68c0-1454-4ceb-ad68-7501d91ccb91

Harrell, T.M., Thomsen, O.T., Dulieu-Barton, J.M., Madsen, S.F. and Carloni, L. (2017) Heat response of unipolar lightning impulse and DC current component conducted through CFRP samples used for wind turbine sparcaps. Wind Energy Science Conference, Copenhagen, Denmark. 25 - 30 Jun 2018.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Lightning protection of wind turbine blades has reached much attention due to the increased number of blade manufacturers now featuring blade designs that include conductive Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) composites for structural components. CFRP materials are stiff and lightweight, but exhibit material properties different from other conductive materials like metals, making them more susceptible to lightning damage. The weaknesses observed is governed by the limited electrical and thermal conductivity, transverse to the fibers, the anisotropic material properties, and the integration of the CFRP into the overall WT blade or aerospace structure.
This study investigates in detail the heat response on CFRP material exposed to two different components of a lightning strike; the unipolar impulse current and the direct current (DC). The first waveform examined is a unipolar 10/350µs waveform simulating the first return stroke during a direct strike according to IEC 61400-24 Ed1.0 , the second being a unipolar long stroke component also defined by the IEC standards. Both current components are tested using the conducted current test method provided in Annex D3.4 of IEC 61400-24 Ed1.01.
CFRP strips made with vacuum assisted liquid resin infusion were exposed to conducting currents as defined above using the two different waveforms. A PYROVIEW 640L IR camera was used to monitor the heat response of each sample. The data from the center of the sample was used to collect the heat response and the results can be seen in Figure 1 and Figure 2. This data helps determine thermal response models to help determine damage from thermal degradation due to electric current.

Text
WESC2017 - TMH_Abstract_rev2
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Published date: 29 June 2017
Venue - Dates: Wind Energy Science Conference, Copenhagen, Denmark, 2018-06-25 - 2018-06-30

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432401
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432401
PURE UUID: 3e6a8937-69f7-4dd6-906f-fd32d7a02c46
ORCID for T.M. Harrell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0783-533X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:29

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×