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Religious networks in the Roman Empire: The spread of new ideas

Religious networks in the Roman Empire: The spread of new ideas
Religious networks in the Roman Empire: The spread of new ideas
The first three centuries AD saw the spread of new religious ideas through the Roman Empire, crossing a vast and diverse geographical, social and cultural space. In this innovative study, Anna Collar explores both how this happened and why. Drawing on research in the sociology and anthropology of religion, physics and computer science, Collar explores the relationship between social networks and religious transmission to explore why some religious movements succeed, while others, seemingly equally successful at a certain time, ultimately fail. Using extensive epigraphic data, Collar provides new interpretations of the diffusion of ideas across the social networks of the Jewish Diaspora and the cults of Jupiter Dolichenus and Theos Hypsistos, and in turn offers important reappraisals of the spread of religious innovations in the Roman Empire. This study will be a valuable resource for students and scholars of ancient history, archaeology, ancient religion and network theory.
Cambridge University Press
Collar, Anna
68e13a75-9b92-4557-aeea-5cd87728cf46
Collar, Anna
68e13a75-9b92-4557-aeea-5cd87728cf46

Collar, Anna (2013) Religious networks in the Roman Empire: The spread of new ideas , Cambridge University Press, 336pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

The first three centuries AD saw the spread of new religious ideas through the Roman Empire, crossing a vast and diverse geographical, social and cultural space. In this innovative study, Anna Collar explores both how this happened and why. Drawing on research in the sociology and anthropology of religion, physics and computer science, Collar explores the relationship between social networks and religious transmission to explore why some religious movements succeed, while others, seemingly equally successful at a certain time, ultimately fail. Using extensive epigraphic data, Collar provides new interpretations of the diffusion of ideas across the social networks of the Jewish Diaspora and the cults of Jupiter Dolichenus and Theos Hypsistos, and in turn offers important reappraisals of the spread of religious innovations in the Roman Empire. This study will be a valuable resource for students and scholars of ancient history, archaeology, ancient religion and network theory.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2013
Additional Information: Finalist: American Academy of Religion's Best New Book in the History of Religions Award

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432423
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432423
PURE UUID: b60f8e55-3fee-41fb-99ae-8cf7e011909c
ORCID for Anna Collar: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7274-2674

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Jul 2019 16:31
Last modified: 11 Aug 2020 01:51

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