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Reverse supply chain practices in developing countries: the case of Morocco

Reverse supply chain practices in developing countries: the case of Morocco
Reverse supply chain practices in developing countries: the case of Morocco
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate reverse supply chain (RSC) practices and their obstacles using case studies of Moroccan companies. The authors present the main findings of case studies’ analysis along with a discussion of an RSC framework for further directions of research.

Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative approach was adopted and semi-structured interviews with Moroccan companies were conducted using an interview guide.Findings: The authors present an RSC model that encompasses remanufacturing, refurbishing and disposal processes. The authors believe that this model would constitute a promising framework for further research. The findings show that the successful implementation of RSC depends on many factors, but the company’s attitude (proactive or conservative) is one of the most critical determinants in RSC initiatives. Furthermore, the results of the case studies indicate two types of inhibitors: external and internal. These findings confirm the results of previous research on environmental sustainability obstacles in general and RSC obstacles in particular.

Research limitations/implications: This study has some limitations that provide future research opportunities. Because this study is qualitative, further statistical support is needed to justify wider generalisation of its findings. Further studies might therefore investigate RSC practices in developing countries other than Morocco to increase the external validity of the results.

Practical implications: The findings can help firms to gain better understanding of their RSC and particularly the link between forward and RSCs. Consequently, companies can upgrade their business models to better control their RSC activities.Originality/value: The relevant literature about RSC practices has mainly targeted manufacturing sectors in developed countries, and few studies have been conducted on developing countries. Research on RSC practices in developing countries in general and African countries in particular is sparse. This is one of the first articles written to address this gap by investigating RSC practices in Morocco.
reverse logistics, reverse supply chains, Moroccan companies, case studies, developing countries
1741-038X
198-216
El Baz, Jamal
a9c03214-7436-434c-9417-46c2b23c6d7d
Frei, Regina
fa00170f-356a-4a0d-8030-d137fd855880
Laguir, Issam
8ee9eba1-ddc9-4bd3-aa55-60155a9397c9
El Baz, Jamal
a9c03214-7436-434c-9417-46c2b23c6d7d
Frei, Regina
fa00170f-356a-4a0d-8030-d137fd855880
Laguir, Issam
8ee9eba1-ddc9-4bd3-aa55-60155a9397c9

El Baz, Jamal, Frei, Regina and Laguir, Issam (2018) Reverse supply chain practices in developing countries: the case of Morocco. Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, 29 (1), 198-216. (doi:10.1108/JMTM-04-2017-0068).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate reverse supply chain (RSC) practices and their obstacles using case studies of Moroccan companies. The authors present the main findings of case studies’ analysis along with a discussion of an RSC framework for further directions of research.

Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative approach was adopted and semi-structured interviews with Moroccan companies were conducted using an interview guide.Findings: The authors present an RSC model that encompasses remanufacturing, refurbishing and disposal processes. The authors believe that this model would constitute a promising framework for further research. The findings show that the successful implementation of RSC depends on many factors, but the company’s attitude (proactive or conservative) is one of the most critical determinants in RSC initiatives. Furthermore, the results of the case studies indicate two types of inhibitors: external and internal. These findings confirm the results of previous research on environmental sustainability obstacles in general and RSC obstacles in particular.

Research limitations/implications: This study has some limitations that provide future research opportunities. Because this study is qualitative, further statistical support is needed to justify wider generalisation of its findings. Further studies might therefore investigate RSC practices in developing countries other than Morocco to increase the external validity of the results.

Practical implications: The findings can help firms to gain better understanding of their RSC and particularly the link between forward and RSCs. Consequently, companies can upgrade their business models to better control their RSC activities.Originality/value: The relevant literature about RSC practices has mainly targeted manufacturing sectors in developed countries, and few studies have been conducted on developing countries. Research on RSC practices in developing countries in general and African countries in particular is sparse. This is one of the first articles written to address this gap by investigating RSC practices in Morocco.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 15 January 2018
Keywords: reverse logistics, reverse supply chains, Moroccan companies, case studies, developing countries

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432479
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432479
ISSN: 1741-038X
PURE UUID: e56bec09-79c4-4bda-814f-10634794d110
ORCID for Regina Frei: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0953-6413

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 02:27

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Contributors

Author: Jamal El Baz
Author: Regina Frei ORCID iD
Author: Issam Laguir

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