The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Decarbonisation and world poverty: a just transition for fossil fuel exporting countries?

Decarbonisation and world poverty: a just transition for fossil fuel exporting countries?
Decarbonisation and world poverty: a just transition for fossil fuel exporting countries?
If dangerous climate change is to be avoided, the majority of the world’s fossil fuel supplies cannot be burned. Fossil fuel exporting countries will therefore lose out on a significant source of revenue – among them some of the world’s poorest countries. Might they have a claim to assistance from the international community if these losses come to pass? If so, on what basis? I examine two distinct arguments for assistance. The first is based on the claim that when our expectations are thwarted by public policy, compensation for those affected may be morally required. The second is premised upon the right to development – a right which is jeopardised when some fossil fuel assets must go unexploited. I argue that the second argument enjoys better prospects. I also discuss several mechanisms which would allow the international community to assist countries incurring losses arising from the need to stabilise our global climate.
0032-3217
671-688
Armstrong, Christopher
2fbfa0a3-9183-4562-9370-0f6441df90d2
Armstrong, Christopher
2fbfa0a3-9183-4562-9370-0f6441df90d2

Armstrong, Christopher (2020) Decarbonisation and world poverty: a just transition for fossil fuel exporting countries? Political Studies, 68 (3), 671-688. (doi:10.1177/0032321719868214).

Record type: Article

Abstract

If dangerous climate change is to be avoided, the majority of the world’s fossil fuel supplies cannot be burned. Fossil fuel exporting countries will therefore lose out on a significant source of revenue – among them some of the world’s poorest countries. Might they have a claim to assistance from the international community if these losses come to pass? If so, on what basis? I examine two distinct arguments for assistance. The first is based on the claim that when our expectations are thwarted by public policy, compensation for those affected may be morally required. The second is premised upon the right to development – a right which is jeopardised when some fossil fuel assets must go unexploited. I argue that the second argument enjoys better prospects. I also discuss several mechanisms which would allow the international community to assist countries incurring losses arising from the need to stabilise our global climate.

Text
Decarbonisation and World Poverty - Accepted Manuscript
Download (542kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 July 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 August 2019
Published date: 1 August 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432487
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432487
ISSN: 0032-3217
PURE UUID: 339cd86e-5792-43c2-bd49-a41f326a97ff
ORCID for Christopher Armstrong: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7462-5316

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 01:55

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×