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C43D-1819: the glacier in winter: technological developments

C43D-1819: the glacier in winter: technological developments
C43D-1819: the glacier in winter: technological developments
Almost all studies of the glacial environment take place during the summer (due to logistical difficulties), and it is often assumed that nothing much happens during the winter once surface melting ceases. However technological developments over the last 15 years, with the emergence of environmental sensor networks, have allowed this rarely studied season to be investigated with surprising results. Instead of winter being a quiet time, this is a time of amazing activity. We report on the winter behaviour of glaciers in Norway and Iceland, using a range of technological methods. We discuss the results from sensors including our unique wireless subglacial probes, web connected GNSS system and time lapse cameras. The technologies used include novel wireless networks, low power rtk-GPS and image analysis. Results include:

Stick-slip events related to warm events
Glacier up-lift events and reorganization of the subglacial hydrology
Continual till deformation and moraine building
Some of largest annual discharges
These results contribute to the debate concerning the response of glaciers to increased surface melting associated with climate change.

This research was funded by National Geographic, EPSRC, The Royal Society, The Leverhulme Trust, Formula E and ARM.
Hart, Jane
e949a885-7b26-4544-9e15-32ba6f87e49a
Martinez, Kirk
5f711898-20fc-410e-a007-837d8c57cb18
Hart, Jane
e949a885-7b26-4544-9e15-32ba6f87e49a
Martinez, Kirk
5f711898-20fc-410e-a007-837d8c57cb18

Hart, Jane and Martinez, Kirk (2018) C43D-1819: the glacier in winter: technological developments. American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2018: AGU 100, Washington D.C., United States. 10 - 14 Dec 2018.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Almost all studies of the glacial environment take place during the summer (due to logistical difficulties), and it is often assumed that nothing much happens during the winter once surface melting ceases. However technological developments over the last 15 years, with the emergence of environmental sensor networks, have allowed this rarely studied season to be investigated with surprising results. Instead of winter being a quiet time, this is a time of amazing activity. We report on the winter behaviour of glaciers in Norway and Iceland, using a range of technological methods. We discuss the results from sensors including our unique wireless subglacial probes, web connected GNSS system and time lapse cameras. The technologies used include novel wireless networks, low power rtk-GPS and image analysis. Results include:

Stick-slip events related to warm events
Glacier up-lift events and reorganization of the subglacial hydrology
Continual till deformation and moraine building
Some of largest annual discharges
These results contribute to the debate concerning the response of glaciers to increased surface melting associated with climate change.

This research was funded by National Geographic, EPSRC, The Royal Society, The Leverhulme Trust, Formula E and ARM.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 13 December 2018
Venue - Dates: American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2018: AGU 100, Washington D.C., United States, 2018-12-10 - 2018-12-14

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432530
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432530
PURE UUID: fc14fb6c-7036-4ac4-987a-76f0f4d93ac0
ORCID for Jane Hart: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2348-3944
ORCID for Kirk Martinez: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3859-5700

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:25

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