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Surface melt driven behaviour in soft bedded glaciers

Surface melt driven behaviour in soft bedded glaciers
Surface melt driven behaviour in soft bedded glaciers
Recent research has suggested that increased melting associated with climate change may not necessarily lead to increased glacier velocities and accelerated melt, because the glacier adapts its subglacial hydrology to accommodate this additional melt. However the majority of studies have focused on hard bedded glaciers, particularly from Greenland. In contrast, the ice streams of Antarctica (and parts of the Quaternary ice sheets) are underlain by a soft bed, which have a different subglacial hydrology and potentially a different dynamic response.
We present an instrumented data set (from unique in situ wireless probes, GPR, geophones and dGPS over a period of five years) from an Icelandic temperate soft bedded glacier, to study the effect of increased surface melting on the behaviour of glaciers with unconsolidated beds. We use this data to investigate water pathways through the ice and the till in order to understand a multi-year seasonal response to surface melt, and to determine to what degree does water pressure variation moderate ice flow.
Hart, Jane
e949a885-7b26-4544-9e15-32ba6f87e49a
Martinez, Kirk
5f711898-20fc-410e-a007-837d8c57cb18
Hart, Jane
e949a885-7b26-4544-9e15-32ba6f87e49a
Martinez, Kirk
5f711898-20fc-410e-a007-837d8c57cb18

Hart, Jane and Martinez, Kirk (2018) Surface melt driven behaviour in soft bedded glaciers. American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2018: AGU 100, Washington D.C., United States. 10 - 14 Dec 2018.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Recent research has suggested that increased melting associated with climate change may not necessarily lead to increased glacier velocities and accelerated melt, because the glacier adapts its subglacial hydrology to accommodate this additional melt. However the majority of studies have focused on hard bedded glaciers, particularly from Greenland. In contrast, the ice streams of Antarctica (and parts of the Quaternary ice sheets) are underlain by a soft bed, which have a different subglacial hydrology and potentially a different dynamic response.
We present an instrumented data set (from unique in situ wireless probes, GPR, geophones and dGPS over a period of five years) from an Icelandic temperate soft bedded glacier, to study the effect of increased surface melting on the behaviour of glaciers with unconsolidated beds. We use this data to investigate water pathways through the ice and the till in order to understand a multi-year seasonal response to surface melt, and to determine to what degree does water pressure variation moderate ice flow.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: December 2018
Additional Information: C51G-1155
Venue - Dates: American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2018: AGU 100, Washington D.C., United States, 2018-12-10 - 2018-12-14

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432531
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432531
PURE UUID: 6fbf7476-1b39-4347-856b-5d078751352b
ORCID for Jane Hart: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2348-3944
ORCID for Kirk Martinez: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3859-5700

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:25

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