The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Meta-analysis of management effects on biodiversity in plantation and secondary forests of Japan

Meta-analysis of management effects on biodiversity in plantation and secondary forests of Japan
Meta-analysis of management effects on biodiversity in plantation and secondary forests of Japan
Conservation of temperate forest biodiversity has historically focused on natural old-growth. Less than 3% of the world’s temperate forests remain unmodified by humans, however, and much of temperate-forest biodiversity is held in the predominating planted and secondary forests. Japan provides a widely applicable model for examining how to maximize biodiversity in managed temperate forests, due to its richness of forestry research generated from its vast forest area, albeit largely in Japanese, and the wide practice of its dominant management interventions across the northern temperate zone. Management for plantations include thinning, extended rotation cycles and clear-cutting. For secondary forests regenerating from past clearance, traditional management varies in its intensities, from clear-cutting as coppices to small-scale understorey clearance. Here we provide a first synthesis of published research on biodiversity in planted and secondary forests of Japan, relevant to management of these types of forest in northern temperate forests. Systematic review and meta-analyses of papers published in English and Japanese quantified management impacts on species richness and abundance of several taxa, in relation to moderator variables including stand age and management intensity. Plantation thinning substantially increases the richness and abundance of several taxa. Effect sizes decline with time since thinning for the abundance of regenerating saplings and seedlings, necessitating repeated thinning treatments every six years to sustain this positive effect. Taxonomic groups exhibit variable relationships with stand age in both planted and secondary forests, indicating a need to include both young and old forest stands in managed forest mosaics. We find an insufficient evidence base is available to allow for a meaningful synthesis of low intensity management effects in historically managed secondary forests, with studies varying widely in scale and reported outcomes. We outline an agenda for the research community to achieve a systematic evaluation of scale-dependent effects of traditional forest management on biodiversity.
Spake, Rebecca
1cda8ad0-2ab2-45d9-a844-ec3d8be2786a
Yanou, Sakiko
0cf37426-b4c2-4c1a-b110-d9504b900574
Yamaura, Yuichi
bbf8dfea-dc1b-4e25-9919-cc76d293ec2c
Kawamura, Kazuhiro
93733a9e-f79d-420a-b913-e46d0d47ea40
Kitayama, Kanehiro
9478c892-eecf-4c45-99b3-c2845c1f024e
Doncaster, Charles
0eff2f42-fa0a-4e35-b6ac-475ad3482047
Spake, Rebecca
1cda8ad0-2ab2-45d9-a844-ec3d8be2786a
Yanou, Sakiko
0cf37426-b4c2-4c1a-b110-d9504b900574
Yamaura, Yuichi
bbf8dfea-dc1b-4e25-9919-cc76d293ec2c
Kawamura, Kazuhiro
93733a9e-f79d-420a-b913-e46d0d47ea40
Kitayama, Kanehiro
9478c892-eecf-4c45-99b3-c2845c1f024e
Doncaster, Charles
0eff2f42-fa0a-4e35-b6ac-475ad3482047

Spake, Rebecca, Yanou, Sakiko, Yamaura, Yuichi, Kawamura, Kazuhiro, Kitayama, Kanehiro and Doncaster, Charles (2019) Meta-analysis of management effects on biodiversity in plantation and secondary forests of Japan. Conservation Science and Practice, 1 (3), [e14]. (doi:10.1002/csp2.14).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Conservation of temperate forest biodiversity has historically focused on natural old-growth. Less than 3% of the world’s temperate forests remain unmodified by humans, however, and much of temperate-forest biodiversity is held in the predominating planted and secondary forests. Japan provides a widely applicable model for examining how to maximize biodiversity in managed temperate forests, due to its richness of forestry research generated from its vast forest area, albeit largely in Japanese, and the wide practice of its dominant management interventions across the northern temperate zone. Management for plantations include thinning, extended rotation cycles and clear-cutting. For secondary forests regenerating from past clearance, traditional management varies in its intensities, from clear-cutting as coppices to small-scale understorey clearance. Here we provide a first synthesis of published research on biodiversity in planted and secondary forests of Japan, relevant to management of these types of forest in northern temperate forests. Systematic review and meta-analyses of papers published in English and Japanese quantified management impacts on species richness and abundance of several taxa, in relation to moderator variables including stand age and management intensity. Plantation thinning substantially increases the richness and abundance of several taxa. Effect sizes decline with time since thinning for the abundance of regenerating saplings and seedlings, necessitating repeated thinning treatments every six years to sustain this positive effect. Taxonomic groups exhibit variable relationships with stand age in both planted and secondary forests, indicating a need to include both young and old forest stands in managed forest mosaics. We find an insufficient evidence base is available to allow for a meaningful synthesis of low intensity management effects in historically managed secondary forests, with studies varying widely in scale and reported outcomes. We outline an agenda for the research community to achieve a systematic evaluation of scale-dependent effects of traditional forest management on biodiversity.

Text
Accepted manuscript - Accepted Manuscript
Download (1MB)
Text
csp2.14 - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (4MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 February 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 March 2019
Published date: 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432597
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432597
PURE UUID: f689480b-aca9-4ada-8dba-81027f44c8d9
ORCID for Charles Doncaster: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9406-0693

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jul 2019 16:43
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 07:32

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Rebecca Spake
Author: Sakiko Yanou
Author: Yuichi Yamaura
Author: Kazuhiro Kawamura
Author: Kanehiro Kitayama

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×