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Inbodied Interaction: 3 things you need to know about how your body works to lead HCI innovation

Inbodied Interaction: 3 things you need to know about how your body works to lead HCI innovation
Inbodied Interaction: 3 things you need to know about how your body works to lead HCI innovation
From Ergonomics to Embodied interaction, the body is a fundamental locus of interaction in HCI research and design. In HCI the body and all its awesome complexity, however, is largely treated as a black box where we focus on designing around the constraints of its input and output. If we understand, for instance, how sleep affects ability to see errors, or how stress suppresses creativity or affects recall, or how social interaction with movement enhances insight, we can immediately begin to explore new kinds of design challenges to help us perform better from general to specific contexts: how would we design a tool that identifies sleep and stress patterns to prompt counter-intuitive but beneficial increase of social engagement prior to a critical deadline, for instance? In this course we explore how, by cracking the lid of the body black box via three accessible heuristics, we can address these new kinds of questions to enable us to innovate better designs for human performance and enhanced quality of life for all.
inbodied, inbodied interaction, innovation, creativity, body, brain
1205-1208
ACM
schraefel, m.c.
ac304659-1692-47f6-b892-15113b8c929f
schraefel, m.c.
ac304659-1692-47f6-b892-15113b8c929f

schraefel, m.c. (2017) Inbodied Interaction: 3 things you need to know about how your body works to lead HCI innovation. In CHI EA '17 Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM. pp. 1205-1208 . (doi:10.1145/3027063.3027092).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

From Ergonomics to Embodied interaction, the body is a fundamental locus of interaction in HCI research and design. In HCI the body and all its awesome complexity, however, is largely treated as a black box where we focus on designing around the constraints of its input and output. If we understand, for instance, how sleep affects ability to see errors, or how stress suppresses creativity or affects recall, or how social interaction with movement enhances insight, we can immediately begin to explore new kinds of design challenges to help us perform better from general to specific contexts: how would we design a tool that identifies sleep and stress patterns to prompt counter-intuitive but beneficial increase of social engagement prior to a critical deadline, for instance? In this course we explore how, by cracking the lid of the body black box via three accessible heuristics, we can address these new kinds of questions to enable us to innovate better designs for human performance and enhanced quality of life for all.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 6 May 2017
Published date: 2017
Keywords: inbodied, inbodied interaction, innovation, creativity, body, brain

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Local EPrints ID: 432637
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432637
PURE UUID: 9ca3398a-bc90-49ab-b9a3-4c533244d35a

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 22 Jul 2019 16:30

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