The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The Mediterranean is getting saltier: From the past to the future

The Mediterranean is getting saltier: From the past to the future
The Mediterranean is getting saltier: From the past to the future
The Mediterranean region is getting drier. Evaporation has been steadily increasing over the last few decades driven by the rapid surface warming implying an increase of latent heat loss from the sea surface. A long-term decrease of river freshwater discharge has been also observed since the early 1960s, reflecting the impact of both river damming and recent climate change. As a result of the net evaporation increasing rate, the salt content of the basin has been also strongly increasing over the last four to five decades with this salinification signal rapidly travelling from the surface into the deep layers via the intense Mediterranean overturning circulation. Long-term increases were also observed in the salinity of the Levantine Intermediate Water layer throughout the basin, which strongly influences cold-water coral habitats and distribution. Climate models predict that the present warming and salinification trends will be accelerated over this century and they are expected to have strong impacts on marine ecosystems and biodiversity.
Mediterranean Sea, Salinity, Evaporation, River runoff, Cold-water corals
507-512
Springer
Skliris, Nikolaos
07af7484-2e14-49aa-9cd3-1979ea9b064e
Orejas, Covadonga
Jimenez, Carlos
Skliris, Nikolaos
07af7484-2e14-49aa-9cd3-1979ea9b064e
Orejas, Covadonga
Jimenez, Carlos

Skliris, Nikolaos (2019) The Mediterranean is getting saltier: From the past to the future. In, Orejas, Covadonga and Jimenez, Carlos (eds.) Mediterranean Cold-Water Corals: Past, Present and Future. (Coral Reefs of the World, , (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-91608-8_42), 9) Cham. Springer, pp. 507-512. (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-91608-8_42).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The Mediterranean region is getting drier. Evaporation has been steadily increasing over the last few decades driven by the rapid surface warming implying an increase of latent heat loss from the sea surface. A long-term decrease of river freshwater discharge has been also observed since the early 1960s, reflecting the impact of both river damming and recent climate change. As a result of the net evaporation increasing rate, the salt content of the basin has been also strongly increasing over the last four to five decades with this salinification signal rapidly travelling from the surface into the deep layers via the intense Mediterranean overturning circulation. Long-term increases were also observed in the salinity of the Levantine Intermediate Water layer throughout the basin, which strongly influences cold-water coral habitats and distribution. Climate models predict that the present warming and salinification trends will be accelerated over this century and they are expected to have strong impacts on marine ecosystems and biodiversity.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 11 July 2019
Published date: 2019
Keywords: Mediterranean Sea, Salinity, Evaporation, River runoff, Cold-water corals

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432692
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432692
PURE UUID: d1e309fb-7e9e-4e9b-899d-c5320ee3be16

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 12 Aug 2020 16:37

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Editor: Covadonga Orejas
Editor: Carlos Jimenez

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×