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Additive manufacturing as a socio-technical system

Additive manufacturing as a socio-technical system
Additive manufacturing as a socio-technical system
The enthusiasm for 3D printing is quickly spreading around the world. Technological advances in 3D printing and other techniques initially intended for rapid prototyping make it possible to produce sophisticated parts with relatively simple means. While it gives people the possibility to fabricate sophisticated objects by themselves, it comes with challenges and considerable drawbacks. 3D printers using recycled materials are still rare, and the rubbish island swimming in the Oceans is growing fast. Additive manufacturing leads to a change in the manufacturing world involving technology and society. With the integration of 3D scanning, virtual design worlds, and 3D printing, the separation between the physical and virtual worlds gradually vanishes. Being able to produce almost anything anywhere and at any time will lead to changes in the way industrial manufacturing and supply chains work – reducing transportation but also efficiency. People will increasingly produce things at home or in local manufacturing communities, using both original and self-made designs. This has implications for the environment, intellectual property laws, the economy and other aspects like safety and security. This article analyses the trend towards personal manufacturing and its many implications. Sketching a socio-technical model of this emerging system, it makes preliminary recommendations for regulating policies.
socio-technical systems, manufacturing, 3D printing, sustainability, recycling, supply chain, policy
2455-4847
18-33
Frei, Regina
fa00170f-356a-4a0d-8030-d137fd855880
Bausch, Nils
c4e2b4a9-e7df-43c8-a127-cf8e8db06239
Frei, Regina
fa00170f-356a-4a0d-8030-d137fd855880
Bausch, Nils
c4e2b4a9-e7df-43c8-a127-cf8e8db06239

Frei, Regina and Bausch, Nils (2016) Additive manufacturing as a socio-technical system. International Journal of Latest Engineering and Management Research, 1 (10), 18-33.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The enthusiasm for 3D printing is quickly spreading around the world. Technological advances in 3D printing and other techniques initially intended for rapid prototyping make it possible to produce sophisticated parts with relatively simple means. While it gives people the possibility to fabricate sophisticated objects by themselves, it comes with challenges and considerable drawbacks. 3D printers using recycled materials are still rare, and the rubbish island swimming in the Oceans is growing fast. Additive manufacturing leads to a change in the manufacturing world involving technology and society. With the integration of 3D scanning, virtual design worlds, and 3D printing, the separation between the physical and virtual worlds gradually vanishes. Being able to produce almost anything anywhere and at any time will lead to changes in the way industrial manufacturing and supply chains work – reducing transportation but also efficiency. People will increasingly produce things at home or in local manufacturing communities, using both original and self-made designs. This has implications for the environment, intellectual property laws, the economy and other aspects like safety and security. This article analyses the trend towards personal manufacturing and its many implications. Sketching a socio-technical model of this emerging system, it makes preliminary recommendations for regulating policies.

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More information

Published date: 22 November 2016
Keywords: socio-technical systems, manufacturing, 3D printing, sustainability, recycling, supply chain, policy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432725
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432725
ISSN: 2455-4847
PURE UUID: d9e79a25-e508-459e-a00d-9f30792d6fa1
ORCID for Regina Frei: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0953-6413

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 25 Oct 2019 00:21

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