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94. Increased physical activity levels among hospitalised older people: the role of trained volunteers

94. Increased physical activity levels among hospitalised older people: the role of trained volunteers
94. Increased physical activity levels among hospitalised older people: the role of trained volunteers
Introduction: sedentary behaviour among older inpatients is associated with increased risk of functional decline, institutionalisation and death. Studies have shown that exercise and mobility interventions can reduce the risks of some of these adverse effects. However, most studies use paid staff to deliver such interventions. We explored the feasibility and acceptability of training volunteers to promote increased physical activity among older inpatients.
Methods: this pre-post mixed methods study was conducted on acute medical wards for older people. Eligible patients were aged ≥70 years, mobile prior to admission and able to provide written consent. Physical activity levels were measured using two accelerometers: the ankle-worn StepWatch Activity Monitor and wrist-worn GENEActiv. Volunteers were trained and supported by therapists to deliver individual twice-daily activity sessions, which consisted of walking, chair, and/or bed exercises. Six nurses, seven therapists, six volunteers and six patients were interviewed to determine their views of the intervention.
Results: 50 participants pre-intervention (mean age 87 years, SD 4.6) had a median daily step count of 626 (IQR 298–1468) and mean daily acceleration of 9.1 milligravity (SD 3.3) (<10.9 milligravity is considered sedentary). 16 volunteers were then trained and 12 were retained towards the end of the study period (71% retention). 310 activity sessions were offered and 230 (74%) were safely delivered to a further 50 participants (mean age 86.2, SD 5.1) with a daily step count of 912 (IQR 295–1824) and mean daily acceleration of 9.7 milligravity (SD 3.3). The volunteer-led mobility and exercise intervention was well received by patients and staff valued volunteers’ role. Volunteers enjoyed working with both patients and staff in this unique role.
Conclusions: findings from this study demonstrate the sedentary behaviour of older medical inpatients. Trained volunteers can safely deliver mobility and exercise interventions for older inpatients. A controlled trial is required to determine the impact of trained volunteers on patient outcomes.
i27-i30
Lim, Stephen
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Ibrahim, Kinda
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Dodds, Richard M.
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Purkis, Annette
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Strike, Gayle
f19f8fb1-570c-4596-af75-64b23552193e
Baxter, Mark
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Rogers, Anne
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Aihie Sayer, Avan
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Lim, Stephen
dd2bfbd7-7f74-4365-b77e-9989f6408ddc
Ibrahim, Kinda
54f027ad-0599-4dd4-bdbf-b9307841a294
Dodds, Richard M.
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Purkis, Annette
8e1f9de5-0757-4770-9939-6900259efdcf
Strike, Gayle
f19f8fb1-570c-4596-af75-64b23552193e
Baxter, Mark
c6f3b5d2-090d-49c4-99f0-a9e12cb65b5b
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7
Aihie Sayer, Avan
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb

Lim, Stephen, Ibrahim, Kinda, Dodds, Richard M., Purkis, Annette, Strike, Gayle, Baxter, Mark, Rogers, Anne and Aihie Sayer, Avan (2019) 94. Increased physical activity levels among hospitalised older people: the role of trained volunteers. British Geriatrics Society Communications to the Autumn Meeting, , London, United Kingdom. 14 - 16 Nov 2018. i27-i30 . (doi:10.1093/ageing/afy202.02).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Introduction: sedentary behaviour among older inpatients is associated with increased risk of functional decline, institutionalisation and death. Studies have shown that exercise and mobility interventions can reduce the risks of some of these adverse effects. However, most studies use paid staff to deliver such interventions. We explored the feasibility and acceptability of training volunteers to promote increased physical activity among older inpatients.
Methods: this pre-post mixed methods study was conducted on acute medical wards for older people. Eligible patients were aged ≥70 years, mobile prior to admission and able to provide written consent. Physical activity levels were measured using two accelerometers: the ankle-worn StepWatch Activity Monitor and wrist-worn GENEActiv. Volunteers were trained and supported by therapists to deliver individual twice-daily activity sessions, which consisted of walking, chair, and/or bed exercises. Six nurses, seven therapists, six volunteers and six patients were interviewed to determine their views of the intervention.
Results: 50 participants pre-intervention (mean age 87 years, SD 4.6) had a median daily step count of 626 (IQR 298–1468) and mean daily acceleration of 9.1 milligravity (SD 3.3) (<10.9 milligravity is considered sedentary). 16 volunteers were then trained and 12 were retained towards the end of the study period (71% retention). 310 activity sessions were offered and 230 (74%) were safely delivered to a further 50 participants (mean age 86.2, SD 5.1) with a daily step count of 912 (IQR 295–1824) and mean daily acceleration of 9.7 milligravity (SD 3.3). The volunteer-led mobility and exercise intervention was well received by patients and staff valued volunteers’ role. Volunteers enjoyed working with both patients and staff in this unique role.
Conclusions: findings from this study demonstrate the sedentary behaviour of older medical inpatients. Trained volunteers can safely deliver mobility and exercise interventions for older inpatients. A controlled trial is required to determine the impact of trained volunteers on patient outcomes.

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More information

Published date: 7 February 2019
Venue - Dates: British Geriatrics Society Communications to the Autumn Meeting, , London, United Kingdom, 2018-11-14 - 2018-11-16

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432914
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432914
PURE UUID: 8e42d033-8a70-4ce7-9e2e-5b5e02d2c96d
ORCID for Stephen Lim: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2496-2362
ORCID for Kinda Ibrahim: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5709-3867

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Date deposited: 01 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 28 Jan 2022 02:46

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Contributors

Author: Stephen Lim ORCID iD
Author: Kinda Ibrahim ORCID iD
Author: Richard M. Dodds
Author: Annette Purkis
Author: Gayle Strike
Author: Mark Baxter
Author: Anne Rogers
Author: Avan Aihie Sayer

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