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124. What are the needs and preferences of people with Parkinson’s and their informal caregivers for the effective self-management of falling? A mixed methods study

124. What are the needs and preferences of people with Parkinson’s and their informal caregivers for the effective self-management of falling? A mixed methods study
124. What are the needs and preferences of people with Parkinson’s and their informal caregivers for the effective self-management of falling? A mixed methods study
Introduction: falls are common in Parkinson’s disease, and a recognised research priority. This mixed methods study aimed to establish the experiences, needs and preferences of people with Parkinson’s (PwP) who fall, and their informal caregivers, for the effective self-management of falls. PwP with cognitive impairment (CI)/ dementia were included.

Methods: PwP and caregivers completed questionnaires about fall history, fear of falling and caregiver burden. A purposive sub-sample participated in semi-structured interviews. Questionnaires were analysed through descriptive statistics, interviews were analysed through inductive thematic analysis.

Results: 61 PwP and 56 caregivers completed questionnaires. Of these, 20 PwP and 18 caregivers were interviewed. Median number of falls in the last year was 4. 70% reported difficulty getting up from the floor, and caregivers often provided support. 71% of caregivers had high caregiver burden. Five themes emerged from the interviews: (1) establishing reasons for falls: attributions and perceptions; (2) coping and adaptation; (3) recognising and managing risks surrounding falling; (4) concerns and worries about consequences; (5) PwP and caregivers as case managers. There was heterogeneity of situations where PwP could feel unsteady or fall. Dyads often sought to identify the cause of falling; uncertainty could lead to frustration. Dyads displayed a range of problem and emotion-focused coping strategies. Caregivers played a key role in falls management, particularly in the setting of CI/dementia. There was often considerable impact on the relationship within the dyad, with loss of caregiver identity. Dyads could appear lost within the healthcare system, and be unsure of the role of healthcare professionals (HCPs) in falls management.

Conclusions: dyads displayed variety in their experiences and unmet needs for successful falls management. Dyads require support in attributing reasons for falls and in communicating with HCPs. Results from this study will inform the development of a falls-based self-management guide for PwP and caregivers.
i36
Owen, Charlotte
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Ibrahim, Kinda
54f027ad-0599-4dd4-bdbf-b9307841a294
Boswell, Amy
eb31e1cc-9e6b-4699-a0a0-46895c29878a
Dennison, Laura
258a7d7f-677c-4c30-95fb-809d1fc27298
Gaulton, C
963a9e23-5d63-4469-97e9-d319b4b4764b
Kirby, Sarah
9be57c1b-5ab7-4444-829e-d8e5dbe2370b
Roberts, Helen
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253
Owen, Charlotte
4180f299-b1ca-4e3a-839b-faa6867354bc
Ibrahim, Kinda
54f027ad-0599-4dd4-bdbf-b9307841a294
Boswell, Amy
eb31e1cc-9e6b-4699-a0a0-46895c29878a
Dennison, Laura
258a7d7f-677c-4c30-95fb-809d1fc27298
Gaulton, C
963a9e23-5d63-4469-97e9-d319b4b4764b
Kirby, Sarah
9be57c1b-5ab7-4444-829e-d8e5dbe2370b
Roberts, Helen
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253

Owen, Charlotte, Ibrahim, Kinda, Boswell, Amy, Dennison, Laura, Gaulton, C, Kirby, Sarah and Roberts, Helen (2019) 124. What are the needs and preferences of people with Parkinson’s and their informal caregivers for the effective self-management of falling? A mixed methods study. British Geriatrics Society Communications to the Autumn Meeting, London, United Kingdom. 14 - 16 Nov 2018. i36 . (doi:10.1093/ageing/afy205.01).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Introduction: falls are common in Parkinson’s disease, and a recognised research priority. This mixed methods study aimed to establish the experiences, needs and preferences of people with Parkinson’s (PwP) who fall, and their informal caregivers, for the effective self-management of falls. PwP with cognitive impairment (CI)/ dementia were included.

Methods: PwP and caregivers completed questionnaires about fall history, fear of falling and caregiver burden. A purposive sub-sample participated in semi-structured interviews. Questionnaires were analysed through descriptive statistics, interviews were analysed through inductive thematic analysis.

Results: 61 PwP and 56 caregivers completed questionnaires. Of these, 20 PwP and 18 caregivers were interviewed. Median number of falls in the last year was 4. 70% reported difficulty getting up from the floor, and caregivers often provided support. 71% of caregivers had high caregiver burden. Five themes emerged from the interviews: (1) establishing reasons for falls: attributions and perceptions; (2) coping and adaptation; (3) recognising and managing risks surrounding falling; (4) concerns and worries about consequences; (5) PwP and caregivers as case managers. There was heterogeneity of situations where PwP could feel unsteady or fall. Dyads often sought to identify the cause of falling; uncertainty could lead to frustration. Dyads displayed a range of problem and emotion-focused coping strategies. Caregivers played a key role in falls management, particularly in the setting of CI/dementia. There was often considerable impact on the relationship within the dyad, with loss of caregiver identity. Dyads could appear lost within the healthcare system, and be unsure of the role of healthcare professionals (HCPs) in falls management.

Conclusions: dyads displayed variety in their experiences and unmet needs for successful falls management. Dyads require support in attributing reasons for falls and in communicating with HCPs. Results from this study will inform the development of a falls-based self-management guide for PwP and caregivers.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 7 February 2019
Venue - Dates: British Geriatrics Society Communications to the Autumn Meeting, London, United Kingdom, 2018-11-14 - 2018-11-16

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432918
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432918
PURE UUID: 4c34eb74-222f-4749-9d23-854cdf548ae5
ORCID for Kinda Ibrahim: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5709-3867
ORCID for Sarah Kirby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1759-1356
ORCID for Helen Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5291-1880

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 02 Aug 2019 00:34

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