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Autistics speak but are they heard?

Autistics speak but are they heard?
Autistics speak but are they heard?
In this article, we argue that the exclusion of autistic people from meaningful involvement in social scientific research is both ethically and epistemologically problematic, and constitutes a significant barrier to impact. By the term ‘meaningful’, we refer to the inclusion of different autistic voices not merely as sources of empirical material, but as active participants in the production of knowledge on autism. We discuss two trends in research that are of concern:firstly, the failure to explore and engage fully with the lived experiences of participants in social research; secondly, imposition of problematic narratives on autistic experiences,linked to partial or complete absence of engagement with the diverse work of autistic authors. We conclude by pointing to some contemporary developments and intellectual exchanges that serve as exemplars which increase the ethical and epistemological integrity of research on the lived experiences of autistic people.
61-69
Milton, Damian E.M.
b43fabcf-39ba-416c-a5bb-afa619329f34
Bracher, Michael
e9e2fbd6-af5f-4f6e-8357-969aaf51c52e
Milton, Damian E.M.
b43fabcf-39ba-416c-a5bb-afa619329f34
Bracher, Michael
e9e2fbd6-af5f-4f6e-8357-969aaf51c52e

Milton, Damian E.M. and Bracher, Michael (2013) Autistics speak but are they heard? Medical Sociology Online, 7 (2), 61-69.

Record type: Article

Abstract

In this article, we argue that the exclusion of autistic people from meaningful involvement in social scientific research is both ethically and epistemologically problematic, and constitutes a significant barrier to impact. By the term ‘meaningful’, we refer to the inclusion of different autistic voices not merely as sources of empirical material, but as active participants in the production of knowledge on autism. We discuss two trends in research that are of concern:firstly, the failure to explore and engage fully with the lived experiences of participants in social research; secondly, imposition of problematic narratives on autistic experiences,linked to partial or complete absence of engagement with the diverse work of autistic authors. We conclude by pointing to some contemporary developments and intellectual exchanges that serve as exemplars which increase the ethical and epistemological integrity of research on the lived experiences of autistic people.

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More information

Published date: June 2013

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432921
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432921
PURE UUID: 02b7e0ef-ece2-4796-aa7b-0cfa0fb4aa4d
ORCID for Michael Bracher: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5861-2657

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 10 Nov 2021 03:25

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Contributors

Author: Damian E.M. Milton
Author: Michael Bracher ORCID iD

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