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When anger leads to rumination: Induction of relative right frontal cortical activity with transcranial direct current stimulation increases anger-related rumination

When anger leads to rumination: Induction of relative right frontal cortical activity with transcranial direct current stimulation increases anger-related rumination
When anger leads to rumination: Induction of relative right frontal cortical activity with transcranial direct current stimulation increases anger-related rumination
Anger is associated with various responses. Research on the neuroscience of anger has revealed that greater left than right frontal cortical activity is associated with angry approach-oriented responses, such as aggression, whereas greater right than left frontal cortical activity is associated with inhibited angry responses mixed with anxiety. In the current research, we extended these past studies by manipulating asymmetric frontal cortical activity using transcranial direct current stimulation and assessing its influence on ruminative responses to an interpersonal insult. Results revealed that self-reported rumination was greatest for participants who received a manipulated increase in relative right frontal cortical activity compared with those who received either a manipulated increase in relative left frontal cortical activity or sham stimulation. Taken together with past findings, the current results suggest that anger associated with greater relative left frontal cortical activity predicts approach-oriented aggressive action, whereas anger associated with greater relative right frontal cortical activity predicts inhibited rumination.
0956-7976
475-481
Kelley, Nicholas
445e767b-ad9f-44f2-b2c6-d981482bb90b
Hortensius, Ruud
56a900e8-673e-48e0-94ab-bedaf3844697
Harmon-Jones, Eddie
7db5a96c-612b-4994-922e-8e7d0793a094
Kelley, Nicholas
445e767b-ad9f-44f2-b2c6-d981482bb90b
Hortensius, Ruud
56a900e8-673e-48e0-94ab-bedaf3844697
Harmon-Jones, Eddie
7db5a96c-612b-4994-922e-8e7d0793a094

Kelley, Nicholas, Hortensius, Ruud and Harmon-Jones, Eddie (2013) When anger leads to rumination: Induction of relative right frontal cortical activity with transcranial direct current stimulation increases anger-related rumination. Psychological Science, 24 (4), 475-481. (doi:10.1177/0956797612457384).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Anger is associated with various responses. Research on the neuroscience of anger has revealed that greater left than right frontal cortical activity is associated with angry approach-oriented responses, such as aggression, whereas greater right than left frontal cortical activity is associated with inhibited angry responses mixed with anxiety. In the current research, we extended these past studies by manipulating asymmetric frontal cortical activity using transcranial direct current stimulation and assessing its influence on ruminative responses to an interpersonal insult. Results revealed that self-reported rumination was greatest for participants who received a manipulated increase in relative right frontal cortical activity compared with those who received either a manipulated increase in relative left frontal cortical activity or sham stimulation. Taken together with past findings, the current results suggest that anger associated with greater relative left frontal cortical activity predicts approach-oriented aggressive action, whereas anger associated with greater relative right frontal cortical activity predicts inhibited rumination.

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Accepted/In Press date: 26 June 2012
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 February 2013
Published date: April 2013

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432928
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432928
ISSN: 0956-7976
PURE UUID: 776d9ace-a006-4f85-bb68-ea47ced5ebc8

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Date deposited: 01 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 01 Aug 2019 16:30

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Contributors

Author: Nicholas Kelley
Author: Ruud Hortensius
Author: Eddie Harmon-Jones

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