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XMM-Newton detection and spectrum of the second fastest spinning pulsar PSR J0952-0607

XMM-Newton detection and spectrum of the second fastest spinning pulsar PSR J0952-0607
XMM-Newton detection and spectrum of the second fastest spinning pulsar PSR J0952-0607
With a spin frequency of 707 Hz, PSR J0952-0607 is the second fastest spinning pulsar known. It was discovered in radio by LOFAR in 2017 at an estimated distance of either 0.97 or 1.74 kpc and has a low-mass companion with a 6.42 hr orbital period. We report discovery of the X-ray counterpart of PSR J0952-0607 using XMM-Newton. The X-ray spectra can be well-fit by a single power law model (Gamma = 2.5) or by a thermal plus power law model (kTeff = 40 eV and Gamma = 1.4). We do not detect evidence of variability, such as that due to orbital modulation from pulsar wind and companion star interaction. Because of its fast spin rate, PSR J0952-0607 is a crucial source for understanding the r-mode instability, which can be an effective mechanism for producing gravitational waves. Using the high end of our measured surface temperature, we infer a neutron star core temperature of ~10^7 K, which places PSR J0952-0607 within the window for the r-mode to be unstable unless an effect such as superfluid mutual friction damps the fluid oscillation. The measured luminosity limits the dimensionless r-mode amplitude to be less than ~1x10^-9.
1538-4357
1-7
Ho, Wynn C.G.
d78d4c52-8f92-4846-876f-e04a8f803a45
Heinke, Craig O.
d7382ed2-cb85-4e15-b2d9-296fc8b6221d
Chugunov, Andrey I.
9b842a11-49db-428b-a664-bd6ae201a833
Ho, Wynn C.G.
d78d4c52-8f92-4846-876f-e04a8f803a45
Heinke, Craig O.
d7382ed2-cb85-4e15-b2d9-296fc8b6221d
Chugunov, Andrey I.
9b842a11-49db-428b-a664-bd6ae201a833

Ho, Wynn C.G., Heinke, Craig O. and Chugunov, Andrey I. (2019) XMM-Newton detection and spectrum of the second fastest spinning pulsar PSR J0952-0607. The Astrophysical Journal, 882 (2), 1-7, [128]. (doi:10.3847/1538-4357/ab3578).

Record type: Article

Abstract

With a spin frequency of 707 Hz, PSR J0952-0607 is the second fastest spinning pulsar known. It was discovered in radio by LOFAR in 2017 at an estimated distance of either 0.97 or 1.74 kpc and has a low-mass companion with a 6.42 hr orbital period. We report discovery of the X-ray counterpart of PSR J0952-0607 using XMM-Newton. The X-ray spectra can be well-fit by a single power law model (Gamma = 2.5) or by a thermal plus power law model (kTeff = 40 eV and Gamma = 1.4). We do not detect evidence of variability, such as that due to orbital modulation from pulsar wind and companion star interaction. Because of its fast spin rate, PSR J0952-0607 is a crucial source for understanding the r-mode instability, which can be an effective mechanism for producing gravitational waves. Using the high end of our measured surface temperature, we infer a neutron star core temperature of ~10^7 K, which places PSR J0952-0607 within the window for the r-mode to be unstable unless an effect such as superfluid mutual friction damps the fluid oscillation. The measured luminosity limits the dimensionless r-mode amplitude to be less than ~1x10^-9.

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1905.12001 - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 23 July 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 10 September 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432931
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432931
ISSN: 1538-4357
PURE UUID: 58648879-f5a7-4a76-a3d4-9d9d9da55705
ORCID for Wynn C.G. Ho: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6089-6836

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Date deposited: 01 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 01:42

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