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Jealousy increased by induced relative left frontal cortical activity

Jealousy increased by induced relative left frontal cortical activity
Jealousy increased by induced relative left frontal cortical activity
Asymmetric frontal cortical activity may be one key to the process linking social exclusion to jealous feelings. The current research examined the causal role of asymmetric frontal brain activity in modulating jealousy in response to social exclusion. Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex to manipulate asymmetric frontal cortical activity was combined with a modified version of the Cyberball paradigm designed to induce jealousy. After receiving 15 min of tDCS, participants were excluded by a desired partner and reported how jealous they felt. Among individuals who were excluded, tDCS to increase relative left frontal cortical activity caused greater levels of self-reported jealousy compared to tDCS to increase relative right frontal cortical activity or sham stimulation. Limitations concerning the specificity of this effect and implications for the role of the asymmetric prefrontal cortical activity in motivated behaviors are discussed.
1528-3542
550-555
Kelley, Nicholas
445e767b-ad9f-44f2-b2c6-d981482bb90b
Eastwick, Paul
d66dfc3d-0923-41b9-bd05-308259132105
Harmon-Jones, Eddie
7db5a96c-612b-4994-922e-8e7d0793a094
Schmeichel, Brandon
c54e5895-85a2-4e4b-be96-93caa2b7d620
Kelley, Nicholas
445e767b-ad9f-44f2-b2c6-d981482bb90b
Eastwick, Paul
d66dfc3d-0923-41b9-bd05-308259132105
Harmon-Jones, Eddie
7db5a96c-612b-4994-922e-8e7d0793a094
Schmeichel, Brandon
c54e5895-85a2-4e4b-be96-93caa2b7d620

Kelley, Nicholas, Eastwick, Paul, Harmon-Jones, Eddie and Schmeichel, Brandon (2015) Jealousy increased by induced relative left frontal cortical activity. Emotion, 15 (5), 550-555. (doi:10.1037/emo0000068).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Asymmetric frontal cortical activity may be one key to the process linking social exclusion to jealous feelings. The current research examined the causal role of asymmetric frontal brain activity in modulating jealousy in response to social exclusion. Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex to manipulate asymmetric frontal cortical activity was combined with a modified version of the Cyberball paradigm designed to induce jealousy. After receiving 15 min of tDCS, participants were excluded by a desired partner and reported how jealous they felt. Among individuals who were excluded, tDCS to increase relative left frontal cortical activity caused greater levels of self-reported jealousy compared to tDCS to increase relative right frontal cortical activity or sham stimulation. Limitations concerning the specificity of this effect and implications for the role of the asymmetric prefrontal cortical activity in motivated behaviors are discussed.

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tDCS jealousy (Emotion Revision Final) - Author's Original
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Published date: October 2015

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432973
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432973
ISSN: 1528-3542
PURE UUID: 496ca883-2970-4ce1-93ee-39f7f8ddec4a

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Date deposited: 05 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 29 Jan 2020 17:38

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Contributors

Author: Nicholas Kelley
Author: Paul Eastwick
Author: Eddie Harmon-Jones
Author: Brandon Schmeichel

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