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Evaluation of the shift in antimicrobial resistance due to extended spectrum beta lactamase and AmpC producing enterobacteriaceae in Hampshire England

Evaluation of the shift in antimicrobial resistance due to extended spectrum beta lactamase and AmpC producing enterobacteriaceae in Hampshire England
Evaluation of the shift in antimicrobial resistance due to extended spectrum beta lactamase and AmpC producing enterobacteriaceae in Hampshire England
The aim of this study was to identify shifts in antimicrobial resistance in the Hampshire region including correlations between patient demographic and antibiotic prescribing to inform safe and effective antimicrobial stewardship. 475 ESBL and AmpC producing bacteria, from various infection sites, were obtained from four hospital laboratories in Hampshire, UK, during 2010 and 2012. All isolates were identified to species level. ESBL production and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using disc diffusion methodology. Multiplex PCR and gel electrophoresis was used to detect the BlaCTX, BlaTEM and BlaSHV resistance determinants. Corresponding patient data included patient age, gender, location, clinical details and previous antibiotic therapy. Patient information revealed mean ages of 60 and 62 for the 2010 and 2012 cohorts respectively, with ages ranging from 3 months to 96. ESBL production was the most prevalent resistance mechanism (65% in 2010, 79% in 2012), produced mostly by E.coli (85% in 2010, 84% in 2012). While 9 of the 13 antibiotics demonstrated increased resistance, 4 demonstrated a decrease. CTX was the most prevalent resistance determinant (38% in 2010 and 27% in 2012), followed by dual expression of CTX & TEM, TEM, TEM & SHV, SHV, SHV & CTX and all three resistance determinants. A significant correlation between patient age and joint expression of TEM & SHV was observed in 2010, in 2012, patient age significantly correlated with joint CTX and SHV expression. Significant differences could also be determined between resistance determinant type and antimicrobial resistance. This study shows that the incidence of ESBL and AmpC infections and resistance to commonly used antibiotics within Hampshire is increasing both within the hospital and community setting. This emphasises the need for judicious antibiotic prescribing to safeguard this valuable medical commodity.
Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase; Antibiotic Resistance; Antibiotic Prescribing; Infections
2641-9459
1-10
Fouch, S.
2d86af45-7833-42d9-acf9-d31ea2e1d1d3
Mitchell, J.
e8368929-0962-4be5-96cc-51561da6d50a
Lwaleed, B.
e7c59131-82ad-4a14-a227-7370e91e3f21
Zinkevich, V.
90066da8-1586-4d6d-820e-ad194f571de7
Fouch, S.
2d86af45-7833-42d9-acf9-d31ea2e1d1d3
Mitchell, J.
e8368929-0962-4be5-96cc-51561da6d50a
Lwaleed, B.
e7c59131-82ad-4a14-a227-7370e91e3f21
Zinkevich, V.
90066da8-1586-4d6d-820e-ad194f571de7

Fouch, S., Mitchell, J., Lwaleed, B. and Zinkevich, V. (2018) Evaluation of the shift in antimicrobial resistance due to extended spectrum beta lactamase and AmpC producing enterobacteriaceae in Hampshire England. Annals of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, 1 (2), 1-10, [000109].

Record type: Article

Abstract

The aim of this study was to identify shifts in antimicrobial resistance in the Hampshire region including correlations between patient demographic and antibiotic prescribing to inform safe and effective antimicrobial stewardship. 475 ESBL and AmpC producing bacteria, from various infection sites, were obtained from four hospital laboratories in Hampshire, UK, during 2010 and 2012. All isolates were identified to species level. ESBL production and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using disc diffusion methodology. Multiplex PCR and gel electrophoresis was used to detect the BlaCTX, BlaTEM and BlaSHV resistance determinants. Corresponding patient data included patient age, gender, location, clinical details and previous antibiotic therapy. Patient information revealed mean ages of 60 and 62 for the 2010 and 2012 cohorts respectively, with ages ranging from 3 months to 96. ESBL production was the most prevalent resistance mechanism (65% in 2010, 79% in 2012), produced mostly by E.coli (85% in 2010, 84% in 2012). While 9 of the 13 antibiotics demonstrated increased resistance, 4 demonstrated a decrease. CTX was the most prevalent resistance determinant (38% in 2010 and 27% in 2012), followed by dual expression of CTX & TEM, TEM, TEM & SHV, SHV, SHV & CTX and all three resistance determinants. A significant correlation between patient age and joint expression of TEM & SHV was observed in 2010, in 2012, patient age significantly correlated with joint CTX and SHV expression. Significant differences could also be determined between resistance determinant type and antimicrobial resistance. This study shows that the incidence of ESBL and AmpC infections and resistance to commonly used antibiotics within Hampshire is increasing both within the hospital and community setting. This emphasises the need for judicious antibiotic prescribing to safeguard this valuable medical commodity.

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More information

Published date: 6 December 2018
Keywords: Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase; Antibiotic Resistance; Antibiotic Prescribing; Infections

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432991
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432991
ISSN: 2641-9459
PURE UUID: 0fdd00e0-5e87-4606-a165-4927a72a7112

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 21 Nov 2021 17:28

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Contributors

Author: S. Fouch
Author: J. Mitchell
Author: B. Lwaleed
Author: V. Zinkevich

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