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Trait approach motivation moderates the aftereffects of self-control

Trait approach motivation moderates the aftereffects of self-control
Trait approach motivation moderates the aftereffects of self-control
Numerous experiments have found that exercising self-control reduces success on subsequent, seemingly unrelated self-control tasks. Such evidence lends support to a strength model that posits a limited and depletable resource underlying all manner of self-control. Recent theory and evidence suggest that exercising self-control may also increase approach-motivated impulse strength. The two studies reported here tested two implications of this increased approach motivation hypothesis. First, aftereffects of self-control should be evident even in responses that require little or no self-control. Second, participants higher in trait approach motivation should be particularly susceptible to such aftereffects. In support, exercising self-control led to increased optimism (Study 1) and broadened attention (Study 2), but only among individuals higher in trait approach motivation. These findings suggest that approach motivation is an important key to understanding the aftereffects of exercising self-control.
1664-1078
Crowell, Adrienne
d2fc9a3f-fc05-4041-a956-295ddfa4ea6e
Kelley, Nicholas
445e767b-ad9f-44f2-b2c6-d981482bb90b
Schmeichel, Brandon
c54e5895-85a2-4e4b-be96-93caa2b7d620
Crowell, Adrienne
d2fc9a3f-fc05-4041-a956-295ddfa4ea6e
Kelley, Nicholas
445e767b-ad9f-44f2-b2c6-d981482bb90b
Schmeichel, Brandon
c54e5895-85a2-4e4b-be96-93caa2b7d620

Crowell, Adrienne, Kelley, Nicholas and Schmeichel, Brandon (2014) Trait approach motivation moderates the aftereffects of self-control. Frontiers in Psychology, 5, [1112]. (doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01112).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Numerous experiments have found that exercising self-control reduces success on subsequent, seemingly unrelated self-control tasks. Such evidence lends support to a strength model that posits a limited and depletable resource underlying all manner of self-control. Recent theory and evidence suggest that exercising self-control may also increase approach-motivated impulse strength. The two studies reported here tested two implications of this increased approach motivation hypothesis. First, aftereffects of self-control should be evident even in responses that require little or no self-control. Second, participants higher in trait approach motivation should be particularly susceptible to such aftereffects. In support, exercising self-control led to increased optimism (Study 1) and broadened attention (Study 2), but only among individuals higher in trait approach motivation. These findings suggest that approach motivation is an important key to understanding the aftereffects of exercising self-control.

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Published date: 29 September 2014

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Local EPrints ID: 433020
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433020
ISSN: 1664-1078
PURE UUID: a77c3bd7-8361-43e6-a1ca-51c9730bfa02

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Date deposited: 06 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 06 Aug 2019 16:30

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Contributors

Author: Adrienne Crowell
Author: Nicholas Kelley
Author: Brandon Schmeichel

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