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The future of complexity engineering

The future of complexity engineering
The future of complexity engineering
Complexity Engineering encompasses a set of approaches to engineering systems which are typically composed of various interacting entities often exhibiting self-* behaviours and emergence. The engineer or designer uses methods that benefit from the findings of complexity science and often considerably differ from the classical engineering approach of “divide and conquer”.This article provides an overview on some very interdisciplinary and innovative research areas and projects in the field of Complexity Engineering, including synthetic biology, chemistry, artificial life, self-healing materials and others. It then classifies the presented work according to five types of nature-inspired technology, namely: (1) using technology to understand nature, (2) nature-inspiration for technology, (3) using technology on natural systems, (4) using biotechnology methods in software engineering, and (5) using technology to model nature. Finally, future trends in Complexity Engineering are indicated and related risks are discussed.
1896-1541
164-188
Frei, Regina
fa00170f-356a-4a0d-8030-d137fd855880
Di Marzo Serugendo, Giovanna
573471c6-6fba-494c-a440-b9fdd095d1d5
Frei, Regina
fa00170f-356a-4a0d-8030-d137fd855880
Di Marzo Serugendo, Giovanna
573471c6-6fba-494c-a440-b9fdd095d1d5

Frei, Regina and Di Marzo Serugendo, Giovanna (2012) The future of complexity engineering. Central European Journal of Engineering, 2 (2), 164-188. (doi:10.2478/s13531-011-0071-0).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Complexity Engineering encompasses a set of approaches to engineering systems which are typically composed of various interacting entities often exhibiting self-* behaviours and emergence. The engineer or designer uses methods that benefit from the findings of complexity science and often considerably differ from the classical engineering approach of “divide and conquer”.This article provides an overview on some very interdisciplinary and innovative research areas and projects in the field of Complexity Engineering, including synthetic biology, chemistry, artificial life, self-healing materials and others. It then classifies the presented work according to five types of nature-inspired technology, namely: (1) using technology to understand nature, (2) nature-inspiration for technology, (3) using technology on natural systems, (4) using biotechnology methods in software engineering, and (5) using technology to model nature. Finally, future trends in Complexity Engineering are indicated and related risks are discussed.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 11 April 2012
Published date: 11 June 2012

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433040
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433040
ISSN: 1896-1541
PURE UUID: 642090ca-e728-4f77-8019-a917229873ec
ORCID for Regina Frei: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0953-6413

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 01:21

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