The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Climatic and ecological history of Pantepui and surrounding areas

Climatic and ecological history of Pantepui and surrounding areas
Climatic and ecological history of Pantepui and surrounding areas
This chapter reviews the available paleoecological information on Pantepui since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in order to reconstruct the ecological dynamics that have led to the present configuration of plant communities and to unravel the potential environmental drivers involved, with emphasis on regional climate changes and fire. To date, no LGM sediments have been retrieved atop the tepuis, so the vegetation of these summits during the last glaciation remains unknown. Some lowland records suggest that cold LGM climates favored downward migration of temperature-sensitive tepuian species, which drove changes in the taxonomic composition of lowland forests. The available paleoecological record of Pantepui ranges from the early Holocene to the present. These records show two contrasting situations. Some tepui summits exhibit a long vegetation constancy extending back to the mid-Holocene, whereas others document significant changes in sensitive species that have been associated with regional climatic events, such as the Holocene Thermal Maximum, the latitudinal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, the El Niño Southern Oscillation variability, or recent climatic shifts such as the Medieval Climatic Anomaly or the Little Ice Age. This has been interpreted in terms of the site’s sensitivity, and it has been recommended to obtain past records, preferably on elevational ecotones, where vertical migrations of species are more easily detected. During the last millennium, fire, most probably of anthropogenic origin and likely originating on the surrounding uplands, has been a major driver of vegetation change on some tepuis.
33-54
Academic Press
Rull, Valenti
b67093e0-ce27-4884-91a1-fbe7791d5191
Montoya, Encarni
7f93c60f-cc9c-4c5f-bb43-e42a38872e8e
Nogué, Sandra
5b464cff-a158-481f-8b7f-647c93d7a034
Safont, Elisabet
ace2fe6a-a021-4179-8bc0-30cbf06aff84
Vegas-Vilarrúbioa, Teresa
b3d5121f-764e-4ab9-879e-479a088afcf8
Rull, Valenti
Vegas-Vilarrubia, Teresa
Huber, Otto
Senaris, Celsa
Rull, Valenti
b67093e0-ce27-4884-91a1-fbe7791d5191
Montoya, Encarni
7f93c60f-cc9c-4c5f-bb43-e42a38872e8e
Nogué, Sandra
5b464cff-a158-481f-8b7f-647c93d7a034
Safont, Elisabet
ace2fe6a-a021-4179-8bc0-30cbf06aff84
Vegas-Vilarrúbioa, Teresa
b3d5121f-764e-4ab9-879e-479a088afcf8
Rull, Valenti
Vegas-Vilarrubia, Teresa
Huber, Otto
Senaris, Celsa

Rull, Valenti, Montoya, Encarni, Nogué, Sandra, Safont, Elisabet and Vegas-Vilarrúbioa, Teresa (2019) Climatic and ecological history of Pantepui and surrounding areas. In, Rull, Valenti, Vegas-Vilarrubia, Teresa, Huber, Otto and Senaris, Celsa (eds.) Biodiversity of Pantepui : The Pristine “Lost World” of the Neotropical Guiana Highlands. Academic Press, pp. 33-54. (doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-815591-2.00002-1).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

This chapter reviews the available paleoecological information on Pantepui since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in order to reconstruct the ecological dynamics that have led to the present configuration of plant communities and to unravel the potential environmental drivers involved, with emphasis on regional climate changes and fire. To date, no LGM sediments have been retrieved atop the tepuis, so the vegetation of these summits during the last glaciation remains unknown. Some lowland records suggest that cold LGM climates favored downward migration of temperature-sensitive tepuian species, which drove changes in the taxonomic composition of lowland forests. The available paleoecological record of Pantepui ranges from the early Holocene to the present. These records show two contrasting situations. Some tepui summits exhibit a long vegetation constancy extending back to the mid-Holocene, whereas others document significant changes in sensitive species that have been associated with regional climatic events, such as the Holocene Thermal Maximum, the latitudinal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, the El Niño Southern Oscillation variability, or recent climatic shifts such as the Medieval Climatic Anomaly or the Little Ice Age. This has been interpreted in terms of the site’s sensitivity, and it has been recommended to obtain past records, preferably on elevational ecotones, where vertical migrations of species are more easily detected. During the last millennium, fire, most probably of anthropogenic origin and likely originating on the surrounding uplands, has been a major driver of vegetation change on some tepuis.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 21 June 2019
Published date: 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433054
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433054
PURE UUID: d8fa36dc-41c9-4ba9-ae68-b8a71ab15da0
ORCID for Sandra Nogué: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0093-4252

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:04

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Valenti Rull
Author: Encarni Montoya
Author: Sandra Nogué ORCID iD
Author: Elisabet Safont
Author: Teresa Vegas-Vilarrúbioa
Editor: Valenti Rull
Editor: Teresa Vegas-Vilarrubia
Editor: Otto Huber
Editor: Celsa Senaris

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×