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Observations of urban and suburban environments with global satellite scatterometer data

Observations of urban and suburban environments with global satellite scatterometer data
Observations of urban and suburban environments with global satellite scatterometer data

A global and consistent characterization of land use and land change in urban and suburban environments is crucial for many fundamental social and natural science studies and applications. Presented here is a dense sampling method (DSM) that uses satellite scatterometer data to delineate urban and intraurban areas at a posting scale of about 1 km. DSM results are analyzed together with information on population and housing censuses, with Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) imagery, and with Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) night-light data. The analyses include Dallas-Fort Worth and Phoenix in the United States, Bogotá in Colombia, Dhaka in Bangladesh, Guangzhou in China, and Quito in Ecuador. Results show that scatterometer signatures correspond to buildings and infrastructures in urban and suburban environments. City extents detected by scatterometer data are significantly smaller than city light extents, but not all urban areas are detectable by the current SeaWinds scatterometer on the QuikSCAT satellite. Core commercial and industrial areas with high buildings and large factories are identified as high-backscatter centers. Data from DSM backscatter and DMSP nighttime lights have a good correlation with population density. However, the correlation relations from the two satellite datasets are different for different cities indicating that they contain complementary information. Together with night-light and census data, DSM and satellite scatterometer data provide new observations to study global urban and suburban environments and their changes. Furthermore, the capability of DSM to identify hydrological channels on the Greenland ice sheet and ecological biomes in central Africa demonstrates that DSM can be used to observe persistent structures in natural environments at a km scale, providing contemporaneous data to study human impacts beyond urban and suburban areas.

Dense sampling method, Nighttime lights, Population, Scatterometer, Urban
0924-2716
367-380
Nghiem, S. V.
adefb467-c15c-4092-863a-e7833765a6e9
Balk, D.
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Rodriguez, E.
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Neumann, G.
c5f5048a-98df-434b-9dd1-1bb1e2afb02a
Sorichetta, A.
c80d941b-a3f5-4a6d-9a19-e3eeba84443c
Small, C.
b1e26ee7-d29c-4926-8b7a-0a3617dbc72e
Elvidge, C. D.
e36a080a-5b19-43d1-82df-a58671f05f5b
Nghiem, S. V.
adefb467-c15c-4092-863a-e7833765a6e9
Balk, D.
8e5ec7b6-c51c-484e-acd9-be46c9ba8b7a
Rodriguez, E.
647a092d-014a-4b88-8d89-b050e18f5417
Neumann, G.
c5f5048a-98df-434b-9dd1-1bb1e2afb02a
Sorichetta, A.
c80d941b-a3f5-4a6d-9a19-e3eeba84443c
Small, C.
b1e26ee7-d29c-4926-8b7a-0a3617dbc72e
Elvidge, C. D.
e36a080a-5b19-43d1-82df-a58671f05f5b

Nghiem, S. V., Balk, D., Rodriguez, E., Neumann, G., Sorichetta, A., Small, C. and Elvidge, C. D. (2009) Observations of urban and suburban environments with global satellite scatterometer data. ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, 64 (4), 367-380. (doi:10.1016/j.isprsjprs.2009.01.004).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A global and consistent characterization of land use and land change in urban and suburban environments is crucial for many fundamental social and natural science studies and applications. Presented here is a dense sampling method (DSM) that uses satellite scatterometer data to delineate urban and intraurban areas at a posting scale of about 1 km. DSM results are analyzed together with information on population and housing censuses, with Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) imagery, and with Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) night-light data. The analyses include Dallas-Fort Worth and Phoenix in the United States, Bogotá in Colombia, Dhaka in Bangladesh, Guangzhou in China, and Quito in Ecuador. Results show that scatterometer signatures correspond to buildings and infrastructures in urban and suburban environments. City extents detected by scatterometer data are significantly smaller than city light extents, but not all urban areas are detectable by the current SeaWinds scatterometer on the QuikSCAT satellite. Core commercial and industrial areas with high buildings and large factories are identified as high-backscatter centers. Data from DSM backscatter and DMSP nighttime lights have a good correlation with population density. However, the correlation relations from the two satellite datasets are different for different cities indicating that they contain complementary information. Together with night-light and census data, DSM and satellite scatterometer data provide new observations to study global urban and suburban environments and their changes. Furthermore, the capability of DSM to identify hydrological channels on the Greenland ice sheet and ecological biomes in central Africa demonstrates that DSM can be used to observe persistent structures in natural environments at a km scale, providing contemporaneous data to study human impacts beyond urban and suburban areas.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 January 2009
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 March 2009
Published date: 1 July 2009
Keywords: Dense sampling method, Nighttime lights, Population, Scatterometer, Urban

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433080
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433080
ISSN: 0924-2716
PURE UUID: 868ff136-2549-44b2-bf48-381801a6bf94
ORCID for A. Sorichetta: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3576-5826

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 05 Nov 2019 01:36

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Contributors

Author: S. V. Nghiem
Author: D. Balk
Author: E. Rodriguez
Author: G. Neumann
Author: A. Sorichetta ORCID iD
Author: C. Small
Author: C. D. Elvidge

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