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Prosocial games for inclusion: interaction patterns and game outcomes for elementary-aged children

Prosocial games for inclusion: interaction patterns and game outcomes for elementary-aged children
Prosocial games for inclusion: interaction patterns and game outcomes for elementary-aged children
There is good evidence that children’s prosocial skills are positively associated with health, well-being, and academic outcomes. Games-based approaches have demonstrated strong potential for teaching prosocial skills in both digital and non-digital formats. However, much of this research focuses on middle-childhood and adolescence and is based on self-reports from teachers, children, and parents. This paper reports on the pilot evaluation of a digital co-operative game (The Chase), which is based on a ‘shared goal’ interaction pattern such that children have to co-operate in order to be successful in the game. 49 children from Italy and 22 children from the UK, aged 7-10 years participated, playing the game twice in small groups during the course of a day. Children’s moves during gameplay were assessed using logging data, and their interactions with each other represented using a graphical social network analysis. Usability feedback was also obtained from some children and pedagogical possibilities explored with teachers. Findings show that even within a very short period children shifted towards a more co-operative mode of play. The social network analysis revealed the dynamics of these interactions while playing the game. Children enjoyed the game and were highly motivated by it, and teachers were very enthusiastic about the possibilities for embedding the game in their curriculum. These findings provide an encouraging basis for extending the range of digital prosocial games available for elementary-aged children and evaluating these as pedagogical tools for facilitating prosocial behaviours.
cooperative/collaborative learning, elementary education, evaluation methodologies, pedagogical issues, teaching/learning strategies
2212-8689
1-11
Parsons, Sarah
5af3382f-cda3-489c-a336-9604f3c04d7d
Karakosta, Efstathia
10798f3f-a066-46bf-9368-5f0c3ab5c1a3
Boniface, Michael
f30bfd7d-20ed-451b-b405-34e3e22fdfba
Crowle, Simon AG
bee1e5f6-1d8d-4dc7-8312-622b7b1c89f8
Parsons, Sarah
5af3382f-cda3-489c-a336-9604f3c04d7d
Karakosta, Efstathia
10798f3f-a066-46bf-9368-5f0c3ab5c1a3
Boniface, Michael
f30bfd7d-20ed-451b-b405-34e3e22fdfba
Crowle, Simon AG
bee1e5f6-1d8d-4dc7-8312-622b7b1c89f8

Parsons, Sarah, Karakosta, Efstathia, Boniface, Michael and Crowle, Simon AG (2019) Prosocial games for inclusion: interaction patterns and game outcomes for elementary-aged children. International Journal of Child-Computer Interaction, 22, 1-11, [100142]. (doi:10.1016/j.ijcci.2019.100142).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is good evidence that children’s prosocial skills are positively associated with health, well-being, and academic outcomes. Games-based approaches have demonstrated strong potential for teaching prosocial skills in both digital and non-digital formats. However, much of this research focuses on middle-childhood and adolescence and is based on self-reports from teachers, children, and parents. This paper reports on the pilot evaluation of a digital co-operative game (The Chase), which is based on a ‘shared goal’ interaction pattern such that children have to co-operate in order to be successful in the game. 49 children from Italy and 22 children from the UK, aged 7-10 years participated, playing the game twice in small groups during the course of a day. Children’s moves during gameplay were assessed using logging data, and their interactions with each other represented using a graphical social network analysis. Usability feedback was also obtained from some children and pedagogical possibilities explored with teachers. Findings show that even within a very short period children shifted towards a more co-operative mode of play. The social network analysis revealed the dynamics of these interactions while playing the game. Children enjoyed the game and were highly motivated by it, and teachers were very enthusiastic about the possibilities for embedding the game in their curriculum. These findings provide an encouraging basis for extending the range of digital prosocial games available for elementary-aged children and evaluating these as pedagogical tools for facilitating prosocial behaviours.

Text
Parsons et al Prosocial interaction patterns ACCEPTED Author version 31st July 2019 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 31 July 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 5 August 2019
Published date: November 2019
Keywords: cooperative/collaborative learning, elementary education, evaluation methodologies, pedagogical issues, teaching/learning strategies

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433116
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433116
ISSN: 2212-8689
PURE UUID: 3034917b-c211-4151-8ffe-c01626a27c66
ORCID for Sarah Parsons: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2542-4745

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 05 Aug 2020 04:01

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